Antigen for Microsoft Exchange

Quick look

One-stop server antivirus protection


Price: $18 per user for 250 users for two years

Phone: 631-630-8500

Online: www.sybari.com

If you are a busy executive and are tired of getting jammed up with viruses, have your technicians protect you at the source.

Why bother fooling around trying to put virus protection on your local client system if you can protect yourself and your entire network in one simple step? Antigen for Microsoft Exchange from Sybari Software Inc. of East Northport, N.Y., acts like an umbrella, shielding your users from virus threats before they reach their inboxes.

Installation, even on an older Exchange 5.5 server, went like clockwork. And once the program was in place, it was easy to configure settings for network needs. An administrator can even add outbound disclaimers to e-mail messages, or certain types of messages. Antigen has the ability to filter content, though it's not primarily designed for it.

We unleashed our hoard of GCN zoo viruses from their cages and herded them into the network. The motley crew of stealth viruses, insidious worms and even macro virus threats all were intercepted by Antigen before ever touching a client.

You can send a message to the user saying the virus has been purged, or simply destroy it without users ever knowing they were targeted. The interface for the administrator is very intuitive.

One of the biggest problems we've found with software of this type is that the log files that record incidents tend to get clogged and unmanageable. Sybari must have recognized this as well, because you can easily purge your incident database, or set it to automatically purge once a certain level is reached.

The lab's technicians were able to set the log to back itself up before purging, in case the data is needed later to look for attack patterns. If this doesn't interest you, the logs can simply be purged.

Updates are automatic at the server level. When new virus profiles become available, the software gets them. Users, and even the administrator, can be completely hands-off if they like. For virus protection on an Exchange server, this is about as close to a silver bullet as you are likely going to get.

About the Author

John Breeden II is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

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