Backup Exec updated

GCN Insider | Trends and technologies that affect the way government does IT

Back up the mailboxes, or the e-mail database? This is the question faced by every Microsoft Exchange administrator. Backing up the entire database might be quickest, though individual e-mails cannot be restored without reinstating the entire database. On the other hand, backing up the mailboxes does give administrators more fine-grained control over what can be fetched, but copying individual mailboxes takes far more backup. And, depending on the software you used, retrieving e-mail from these mailbox-based backups can be somewhat of an arduous task.

With the new version of Backup Exec, out this month, Symantec attempts to address such backup and retrieval problems. Backup Exec 11D applies continuous backup protection, which was introduced in Backup Exec 10D for files, to both Exchange mailbox and full database backups. With CDP, files are backed up as they are changed, rather than at set intervals. So that those lengthy backup windows can be eliminated (though at the expense of adding a bit of traffic to the network, we presume). The company has also improved the interface for retrieving archived e-mail, said Michael Parker, senior product market manager for Backup Exec.

Backup Exec also tackles a number of other Microsoft applications. It can now backup Active Directory files, allowing users to restore accounts without rebooting the Active Directory server, Parker said. The new software can also back up Microsoft application data, such as Microsoft SharePoint and SQL Server database files as well.

About the Author

Joab Jackson is the senior technology editor for Government Computer News.

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