Lab Impressions


A battery that lasts 10 times longer, charges 10 times faster?

A team at Northwestern University discovers a great leap forward in lithium-ion technology.

Hot enough for you: Data center cooling system heats buildings

The water in the mineral oil-fueled cooling tank, heated by computers to about 122 degrees, is being routed to the HVAC systems of surrounding buildings in Sweden.

Can 'Jailhouse Heat' save 3-D?

The adult entertainment industry has a history of influencing technology choices.

NASA aims to build real tractor beams

The agency will research how beams can be used to move matter, though it might be a while before they can move the sofa.

Need an explosives detector? Just print one out.

Georgia Tech researchers have developed a way to print nanotube-based explosives sensors from an inkjet printer.

'Light field' camera lets you shoot first, focus later

The Lytro camera, developed by image scientist Ren Ng, captures light fields that are assembled into images later and could change how we take pictures.

MIT team's radar array can see through walls, for real

A team at MIT's Lincoln Lab has developed a phased array that delivers a real-time view of what's on the other side of a wall 20 to 60 feet away.

Hammer Time for Google? WireDoo needs fancier pants.

The rapper had better put a little more pizzazz into his new search engine project. We've got a few ideas.

A data center without hard drives: That's Stanford's RAM plan.

Stanford University researchers say a server using only dynamic random-access memory could recover from a crash in 1.6 seconds.

Power of play: Gamers solve 15-year scientific puzzle in 3 weeks

Making AIDS research into a game pays off big for scientists working toward a cure, which opens the door to using online games for other research.

Edvard Munch The Scream

Something wicked: The 10 scariest computer viruses of all time

These 10 doses of malware caused nightmares, and a few changed the world.

What's in your closet: The electronic clutter that surrounds us

While moving to a new office, the Lab uncovers long-forgotten, even mysterious, devices. Don't you have them in your office, too?