From shipments to socks and ants, RFID is tagging everything

Modern RFID tags are only a few millimeters in size and comprise a chip, antenna and in some cases a battery (active). Some forms of RFID tags (passive) have no battery, but actually take power from the electromagnetic beams of a reader, and then send data back to the source. These tags can theoretically last forever, since they only send data or require power when actually being pinged by a reader device. Almost all RFID tags can be inserted into almost anything and do not require line of sight back to a reader. Some tags are so tiny that they have been glued to the backs of ants to track their behavior.

Army puts a 4G battlefield telemedicine system to the test

A real-time system that connects medics on the battlefield with surgeons at a hospital would save lives, if it can be made to work.

Can mobile devices work as ID cards, thin clients on a secure net?

DISA wants software that would let DOD personnel securely use smart phones and tablets on DOD networks.

Agencies yet to 'crack the code' on mobile management, security

Mobility is key for unlocking productivity, but government still struggles to securely manage mobile devices and their data, agency IT leaders say.

Air Force opts for Samsung Slate tablets

The device's portability, features and security could fit the service's requirements.

Keys to mobile security: Consistent controls, user common sense

GAO report on mobile threats concludes that certain agencies, and all users, can help improve security.

NOAA, Navy swimming with the SHARCs

Unmanned ocean-going Wave Gliders proving useful for research and, perhaps, much more.

The world's toughest smart phone?

The Nautiz X1 from the Handheld Group also is surprisingly small and light for a rugged phone.

Intel’s big idea: A hefty 27-inch tablet

The Adaptive All-In-One is a desktop PC and also works as a 27-inch, 14-pound tablet PC. But what can you use it for?

What is LTE, and why is it right for a public safety network?

The details of a national public safety network have yet to be worked out, but the consensus is it will be based on the emerging Long Term Evolution standard.

Public safety network has ‘eye-opening’ first real-world test

Police on the street and in the crowd used iPhones for encrypted voice, data and video, free of the congestion that can hamper a commercial wireless network.

RIM wants your BlackBerry to be your access badge

HID Global has a service that would let users replace ID credentials and tokens with their BlackBerry phones. Could it work in a government enterprise?

Topic Resources

  • How DevOps can accelerate deployment of Healthcare systems with reduced cost and risk: Successes from multiple domains

    Change in Healthcare systems – driven by the new laws and regulations, demands for mobile services, and rising costs – can be delivered with greater speed and quality by integrating DevOps processes and tools into existing development and delivery environments. By applying lean and agile principles across the software delivery lifecycle, DevOps helps organizations deliver a differentiated and engaging customer experience, achieve quicker time to value, and gain increased capacity to innovate.

  • Enabling Government to Citizen Engagement through Mobility and Identity Solutions

    In today’s digital environment, citizens and employees have high expectations for government services. Whether they are checking employee benefits, access tax records, or conducting a transaction, they assume that information or services will be available whenever they need it and whatever device they are using. But to make this possible, agencies need to understand both the tools and tactics for delivering and securing mobile engagement. This webcast will provide agencies with insights into how to leverage the latest developments in mobile and identity technology.

  • Big Five in Overdrive: Are State and Local Networks Ready?

    As state and local government organizations grapple with tight budgets, demanding constituents, growing data volumes, and cross-government coordination challenges, the "Big Five of IT" – data center consolidation, mobility, security, big data, and cloud computing – promise to improve agency performance, productivity, and service. But are state and local networks ready? This research report examines potential network impact, state and local readiness, and how organizations can prepare for the onslaught.

  • Avoiding Insider Threats to Enterprise Security

    This white paper explains how IBM Security Privileged Identity Manager provides enhanced security across various IT environments by centralizing and controlling the use of privileged identities.

  • Managing Threats in the Digital Age

    News of recent security failures have not only resulted in significant expense to the affected enterprises, but have significantly damaged consumer trust and brand reputation. The topic of security is now unquestionably a C-suite priority. Organizations must move toward a more systematic, proactive approach to addressing security threats and managing compliance.