Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


House seeks data center home

House ISO data center home

The House of Representatives is looking for co-located data center space to support its data center operations and the needs of other legislative agencies, including the Library of Congress, Architect of the Capitol, U.S. Capitol Police, Congressional Budget Office, Government Accountability Office, Government Printing Office.

The request for proposals for the six-year contract requires the data center to be maintainable per UpTime  Institute’s Tier III or Tier IV specs, and the contractor must provide 24/7 environmental monitoring of the data center and critical infrastructure.

The contractor must provide for each agency co-location cage assemblies that are managed with auditable biometric access control. The ability to achieve and sustain NIST-800 standards throughout the life of the contract and achieve annual House audit using NIST-800 standards, is also a requrirement.

Rather than a local facility, the RFP requires that the facility be between 300 and 350 miles from Capitol Hill, more than 100 miles from the coastline and less than 100 miles from a military base.  The facility must be able to support long term staff due to disaster recovery or events through government-provided on-premise office trailers.

Proposals are due Nov. 25, 2014. 

Posted on Nov 04, 2014 at 1:45 PM0 comments


NOAA’s lake-level viewer aids climate change planning

NOAA’s lake-level viewer aids climate change planning

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has developed a new online visualization and mapping tool designed to help communities along the Great Lakes plan for changes in water levels associated with climate change.

The Lake Level Viewer uses high-resolution elevation data that lets users accurately visualize water levels ranging from zero to six feet above and below average lake level. Users can view elevation models, determine water depths at specific locations, examine data confidence and view economic impacts.

The tool was developed by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management as part of its Digital Coast initiative.

“The Lake Level Viewer provides planners and decision makers with visual lake level scenarios for rise and drop information before it happens,” said Jim Schwab, a certified planner and the manager of the Hazards Planning Center for the American Planning Association.

“Lake level scenarios can be incorporated into land use decisions, along with economic, social and environmental considerations, to make wise investments in public infrastructure and develop livable, resilient communities,” he added.

More than 4,900 miles of U.S. shoreline ring the Great Lakes, of which 3,800 miles are currently mapped on the Lake Level Viewer according to NOAA. The tool covers areas in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Great Lakes water levels are continuously monitored by U.S. and Canadian agencies in the region through a binational partnership. The annual rise and fall cycle of the Lakes’ water levels can be seen online for particular time periods beginning in 1917 via the Great Lakes Water Level Dashboard.

 “In light of rapidly changing water levels, it is even more important to have a tool like the viewer to help communities visualize and plan for scenarios,” NOAA said in announcing the tool.

Posted on Nov 03, 2014 at 12:56 PM0 comments


Coalition supports e-citation tech for safety, service and savings

Coalition supports e-citation tech for safety, service and savings

Being struck by a vehicle during a traffic stop is a leading cause of death for police officers, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. A new industry group is calling for increased use of electronic citation systems in an effort to reduce time officers spend writing tickets, improving their safety and removing the inefficiency of paper tickets.

Electronic citation systems help law enforcement agencies meet their ever-growing data collection and reporting requirements without compromising officer safety or effectiveness, according to the eCitation Coalition, a 12-member industry group promoting an alternative to traditional paper-based citations.

Use of the technology is expanding fast.

Public safety officers can now use handheld devices, mobile computers and printers to complete traffic stops faster and more safely and efficiently while focusing more of their attention on the offender.

Computer-assisted operations, such as e-ticketing with handheld devices, also provide more accurate information than manual methods – producing complete, enforceable citations that improve conviction rates, reduce court administration time and increase collections.

The citation software can also simplify data entry and help prevent errors while data traffic can be sent over a dedicated public safety network or through commercial cellular services. And e-citation systems can also take advantage of automated card reading, imaging and payment processing, improving functionality and efficiency.

Among the advantages of e-citation cited by the coalition are:

  • Reducing time an officer is on the roadside, which increases safety for officers and citizens.
  • Capturing revenue often lost to errors common in paper-based citation systems.
  • Adding operational efficiencies to the judicial system.
  • Reducing the amount of time needed to issue citations, enabling law enforcement officers to spend more time on patrol and less time on paperwork.

"e-citation solves multiple issues that plague most paper-based systems," said Keith Brin, Lake County, Illinois Circuit Court Clerk.  "In addition to increasing officer safety, e-citation aids courts by reducing processing costs and data entry errors and allows us to redeploy staff into higher value functions."

The coalition is working to educate key law enforcement groups on the benefits of the technology and is supporting state-level legislation that would help defray the initial acquisition and ongoing maintenance of e-citation systems.  

Posted on Oct 30, 2014 at 11:45 AM0 comments


DARPA in search of universal translator tech

DARPA in search of universal translator tech

In their military, diplomatic and heath care roles, U.S. government representatives frequently encounter low-resource languages, which often are less-studied, less-privileged or spoken by small numbers of people such as Inuit or Sindhi.

For many such languages, no available automated language technology exists. Translation resources are expensive and tend to be focused on the most popular languages. But for more than 7,000 languages in the world, military, diplomats and health workers need a way to quickly and inexpensively communicate.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency hopes to address that challenge with its Low Resource Languages for Emergent Incidents (LORELEI) program, which aims to advance computational linguistics and language technology for low-resource languages.

According to a notice in FedBizOpps, DARPA wants to develop language technology that leverages universal language principles instead of relying on huge, manually-translated, transcribed or annotated texts. It also aims to deliver situational awareness for the low-resource foreign language sources as soon as 24 hours after a new language requirement emerges.

While LORELEI technologies may include partial or fully automated speech recognition and/or machine translation, the overall goal is not to be translating foreign languages into English. Instead, the systems  would provide  situational awareness by identifying elements of information in foreign language and English sources, such as topics, names, events, sentiment and relationships.

DARPA is holding a proposer’s day on Nov. 13 to provide information to potential responders to the anticipated LORELEI broad agency announcement.

Posted on Oct 29, 2014 at 10:11 AM0 comments


USPS seeking complaint management system

USPS envisions a CMS for complaints

The U.S. Postal Service has put out feelers for a web-based system to manage all of the documents and records that come in over the agency hotline, including those related to criminal allegations and investigations.

The agency is aiming high. In a recent request for information, USPS listed features it was seeking for the complaint management system.  Files need to be securely stored and access strictly controlled based on user profiles.

USPS also wants the system to be “highly intuitive and configurable by the user,” allowing for easy navigation from case to case or record to record, as well as throughout various sections within each digital case file. The system should also create configurable, unique identifying numbers to each allegation, investigation and hotline complaint.

The needs and requirements for managers and supervisors also need to be addressed so that they can manage and report on the work done by agents in the field. Besides offering an “extensive, user configurable system of approvals, workflows and tracking processes for the various elements within an investigation,” the system should be able to assign investigative responsibility by program area for field investigators and be capable of alerting individuals, via e-mails or personalized dashboards, that an event requires their attention.

For analytics, USPS expects the system to provide dynamic, real-time dashboards and reports depicting the status of various approvals, results, data points and pending items for current investigations and for trend analysis. It would also take advantage of API technology to interface with other analytics products throughout the enterprise network.

Responses are due Nov. 7, 2014.

Posted on Oct 28, 2014 at 1:07 PM0 comments