Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


US, Honduras to test hurricane response simulation

The United States and Honduras will put a mapping tool to the test this week designed to help government and non-government organizations (NGOs) improve situational awareness, locate supplies and react quickly during a humanitarian crisis or natural disaster.

The software, called GeoSHAPE, is an open source and open standard tool that integrates emergency data from multiple formats and displays it as an Internet-based map.

Juan Hurtado, a science advisor to the U.S. Southern Command, said GeoSHAPE, “bridges geospatial information sharing gaps we witnessed during the international response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing a tool for military and civil organizations, local and international, to efficiently coordinate their activities and, in turn, save more lives.”

The tool, which has been through a two-year development effort, will be tested this week during a simulated hurricane event across Central America. The multi-organizational role players will include Honduras’ Permanent Contingency Commission, the local Red Cross, NGO Plan Internacional and U.S. Joint Task Force-Bravo.

Components of GeoSHAPE include a Web-based platform for creating, and sharing geospatially tagged events and a mobile application for capturing data and photos in the field. The tools will help rescue organizations put together a picture of both the resources at hand and extent of the damage.

The availability of hospitals, helicopter landing zones, food, water and medical supplies as well as the deployment of rescue personnel to affected areas will be are plotted in a map authorized users can see from anywhere in the world. 

GeoSHAPE is part of a technology project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense’s Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Emerging Capabilities and Prototyping.

After the demonstration and evaluation in Honduras, the software will be integrated with the Pacific Disaster Center’s DisasterAWARE platform, which provides continuously updated hazard information worldwide and functions as a hub for accessing, updating and sharing relevant data before, during and after a disaster. 

According to Hurtado, disaster relief and humanitarian assistance are only two potential applications for GeoSHAPE. It can also be used in situations where organizations need to share geospatial information, including  peacekeeping missions and border security.

Posted on Jun 10, 2014 at 9:16 AM0 comments


FAA details next steps in NextGen progress

The Federal Aviation Administration is “on cusp of finishing” several key programs that underpin NextGen, the agency’s Next Generation Air Transportation System, the agency said in its 2014 report on the project. NextGen aims to migrate America’s air traffic control system to smarter, satellite-based and digital technologies and add new procedures that will make air travel more efficient, convenient, predictable and environmentally friendly.

In his first report to Congress since becoming chief NextGen officer one year ago, FAA deputy administrator Mike Whitaker detailed progress made toward completing the technological foundation that is bringing greater efficiency and predictability to the nation’s airspace system.

Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast. In March 2014, the FAA completed installing ground infrastructure for ADS-B, a new surveillance system that uses GPS signals to determine an aircraft’s location and delivers traffic, weather and flight information directly to the cockpits of properly equipped aircraft.  

En Route Automation Modernization. The FAA is on track to have all 20 en-route centers operating with ERAM, by the middle of 2015. ERAM will replace HOST, the computer system the FAA has been using to control traffic in high-altitude airspace since the 1970s.

Terminal Automation Modernization and Replacement. By the end of 2016, the FAA expects to have made substantial progress deploying TAMR, a program that upgrades the automation platform used in FAA facilities that controls low-altitude traffic approaching and departing from airports.

“The FAA with NextGen is taking the next quantum leap in air traffic control,” Whitaker said in the FAA’s statement announcing the report.

“We have strengthened our partnerships with key stakeholders, coming to an agreement on a set of near-term capabilities that both the FAA and industry will concentrate on over the next three years. And we have concrete evidence that demonstrates how NextGen works for aviation and for America as a whole.”

With these technologies, the FAA said, airlines are saving time and fuel while reducing exhaust emissions. In the meantime, general aviation pilots are enjoying greater access to airports across the country – especially in bad weather – and air traffic controllers have new tools to help them make the critical decisions necessary to keep the world’s busiest and safest aviation system working as efficiently as possible.

Posted on Jun 09, 2014 at 10:57 AM1 comments


Sandia exploring ephemeral biometrics for insider threat monitoring

The Sandia National Laboratories is researching the use of ephemeral biometrics for identity management and insider threat monitoring and is looking for partners, according to an announcement in Federal Business Opportunities.

With ephemeral biometrics, individual identities are tied to active, living biometric data. Using this research, the Energy lab intends to significantly improve the authenticity and integrity of cyber identities.

Ephemeral biometrics will “significantly enhance the defensive capabilities of cyber and physical protection industries by enabling them with proactive insider threat management tools capable of actively mapping cyber/virtual activities into physically monitor-able and controllable identities,” the lab said in its FBO announcement.

Sandia already conducts research in security analyses, application of RIMES (Risk Informed Management of Enterprise Security), response force modeling, cyber security, physical security and supply chain security. Sandia also has advanced biosensor monitoring capabilities combined with a world class fabrication facility to design next generation biometric monitoring diagnostics.

Sandia is seeking Cooperative Research & Development Agreements (CRADA) or Work for Others (WFO) partnership agreements to enable improvements in cybersecurity authentication and for designing and implementing proactive insider threat management tools. 

Posted on Jun 05, 2014 at 9:27 AM0 comments


NSA gives Lockheed cyber incident response accreditation

Lockheed Martin earned accreditation from the National Security Agency under a new NSA program designed to recognize companies suited to help other organizations respond to cyberattacks.

The NSA’s Cyber Incident Response Assistance Accreditation (CIRA) program meets a growing need to leverage the cyber security expertise of industry leaders, according to Lockheed.

To be qualified as a CIRA service provider, Lockheed Martin said it was evaluated based on its ability to deliver consistent services and maintain a qualified staff to deliver cyber incident response services.

The evaluation process also included a review of the company's ability to deliver 21 critical focus areas of incident response assistance services to owners and operators of National Security Systems.

The CIRA program is a part of the NSA Information Assurance Directorate’s National Security Cyber Assistance Program. The program focuses on intrusion detection, incident response, vulnerability assessment and penetration testing.

Posted on Jun 03, 2014 at 12:42 PM0 comments


Opening up competition in federal IT

The Public Spend Forum, a group focusing on public-sector procurement, analyzed government IT spending  and found that a  “check the box culture” and a broken requirements and procurement process inhibits competition and limits innovation.

Its recent report, Billions in the Balance: Removing Barriers to Competition & Driving Innovation in the Public-Sector IT Market makes several recommendations for IT managers:

  • Establish clear lines of authority and accountability.
  • Develop a simple needs and outcomes statement instead of voluminous RFPs.
  • Engage the market early.
  • Develop a cost/outcome (ROI)-focused IT strategy. 
    • Focus on minimizing cost/outcome as the ROI of a government program
    • Implement flexible IT architectures as recommended in the ACT-IAC 7S for Success Framework.
    • Emphasize prototyping and approaches for minimum viable product rollouts.
    • Avoid monolithic acquisition approaches and instead leverage existing procurement vehicles and allow use of alternative vehicles.
  • Encourage smart risk taking.
  • Reduce burdensome requirements and speed up the procurement process.

The Public Spend Forum provides best practices, industry news and open discussion for the public-sector procurement community.

Posted on Jun 02, 2014 at 1:29 PM0 comments