Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


NOAA updates Whale Alert app

Originally developed in 2012 to help protect endangered right whales on the East Coast, the iOs-based Whale Alert app has been updated to provide mariners in the Pacific with the most current information available about whale movements and conservation initiatives.

The free app uses GPS, Automatic Identification System, wireless Internet and nautical charts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to provide mariners with a single source of information about whale locations and conservation measures in their immediate vicinity.

New features include information about California Marine Protected Areas, PORTS (Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System) tide and weather data and the ability for the public to report whale sightings to databases that NOAA and whale biologists use to map whale habitats and migration patterns.

“Whales are important both ecologically and economically, but they continue to face a variety of threats including ship strikes,” said Michael Carver, deputy superintendent of Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. “Whale Alert allows citizens to provide data scientists can use to inform management and better protect whale populations.”

Whale Alert has been developed by a collaboration of government agencies, academic institutions, non-profit conservation groups and private sector industries, led by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

Whale Alert data collected by citizens and scientists are currently available online at the Whale Alert - West Coast website. “More is usually better when it comes to data,” said Jaime Jahncke, Point Blue Conservation Science lead on the project. “Whale Alert allows us to crowdsource data collection, so that as scientists we have more information available to help protect whales from ships.” 

Whale Alert can be downloaded free of charge from Apple’s App Store. More information on Whale Alert and the groups responsible for its development can be found at www.whalealert.org

Posted on Sep 30, 2014 at 11:33 AM1 comments


CDC seeks all-in-one tool for disease data tracking

CDC seeks all-in-one tool for disease data tracking

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is looking for an all-in-one data tracking and analytics tool to help it meet the rising level of health care trend and emergency data it follows, according to a request for information it recently filed.

In a long wish-list of features, CDC said it was interested in ideas for a single platform that can “integrate, analyze, visualize and report on key surveillance, epidemiologic, laboratory, environmental and other types and sources of data during emergency or routine investigations in an efficient – and timely manner.”

The agency requires a high level of integration because in its role as the nation’s disease tracker, it supports “disease surveillance and epidemiologic investigation activities, laboratory testing, scenario modeling, intelligence gathering, environmental investigation and medical countermeasures deployment,” according to the RFI.

While the Centers can meet those requirements, it faces a number of challenges in doing so, including “many process-driven and technical challenges in [its] capacity to collect, integrate and analyze numerous data types and sources.”

Data integration and unification is a major selling point for acquiring new technology, according to the CDC request. The RFI points out that often lab testing for evidence of pathogens is often performed in multiple labs, multiple CIO offices  and “throughout laboratory response network.” Additionally, lab results are “contained within and reported through a variety of IT systems. On top of that, “epidemiology related systems … have evolved independently of each other.” The list of dis-integration is a long one.

The envisioned platform would let CDC “standardize a core set of data elements across multiple surveillance programs and event responses to capture data in a consistent manner, as well as integrate new data types and unstructured data,” said CDC.

The platform would give CDC’s external partners near real-time access to event data through a secure interface and “enable infrequent and new users as well as experienced users to successfully operate the system with limited training.”

Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 12:59 PM0 comments


moocdemic

Penn State to release Moocdemic 2.0

Against the backdrop of the rapidly spreading Ebola virus, researchers at Penn State will soon launch Moocdemic 2.0, a massive multiplayer game simulation, an optional component to a massive online open course (MOOC) on epidemics.

By playing location-based Moocdemic, students detect, spread and control a fictional infectious disease in real time.

Like Moocdemic 1.0, in this second version of the platform, players create an account accessible through a smartphone or computer. The application scans for diseases, or cases, using the player’s location. As players move through their environment, they get points for spotting nearby cases and sharing that information via social media. Moocdemic supports Apple and Android devices and is completely free to play.

The game is being run in parallel with a free MOOC on epidemiology offered through Coursera. The course, called Epidemics - the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases, will run this year from Sept. 29 to Dec. 1.

"The game allows players to experience a global disease outbreak in real time without being exposed to any real risk, other than game addiction," developer and assistant professor Marcel Salathé told Directions Magazine.

Moocdemic was developed by scientists at the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics at Penn State University. It is a Ruby on Rails app with a PostgreSQL database and is hosted on Heroku, according to the game’s website. 

Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 11:03 AM0 comments


NARA reminds agencies of automated email deadlines

The National Archives and Records Administration reiterated its guidance to federal agencies on email management. Converting to automated email management will reduce the risks involved in human management of email.

In light of the Dec. 31, 2016, deadline for all email to be managed electronically, NARA said it will continue to issue guidance that assists agencies meet the goals of the directive and federal records management requirements under the Federal Records Act.

The question-and-answer formatted memorandum from  the Office of Management and Budget covers:

  • The kinds of emails that are official federal records
  • Agency responsibilities for email management
  • The role of federal employees in email management
  • A description of the Capstone approach to managing email
  • Guidance on email retention
  • Strategies for mitigation against loss of emails
  • Instructions on reporting email loss
  • Sources for more information

OMB also reminded agencies of other goals from the Managing Government Records Directive that are due at the end of this year, which include ensuring that that agencies and their employees understand their accountability and that all agencies must establish and develop suitable records management training.

Posted on Sep 23, 2014 at 10:15 AM0 comments


ICMA, SAS launch analytics platform for local gov

The International City/County Management Association (ICMA) unveiled ICMA Insights, a performance management and analytics solution for local governments that lets them easily collect, clean, report, benchmark and analyze their data.

Developed by ICMA in partnership with analytics software developer SAS, ICMA Insights aims to help communities synthesize data they collect across the services they provide – such as police, fire, trash collection, building permits – to track performance metrics and drive improvements in service delivery.

Five levels of service are offered to cover a range of community and budget sizes. The tier services range from basic summary statistics and integrated reporting to more advanced customizable graphs, scorecards, dashboards and performance forecasting. Multiple local user licenses with additional users based on population are also available.

"It's extremely fitting that as we look ahead to the next 100 years of local government leadership, performance management is front and center," said Bob O'Neill, Executive Director of ICMA.

"If we can get 2,000 communities in our database, participants can then match their performance against lots of other communities and make evaluations based not only on their own historical performance but against a universe of similar communities."

The service includes training modules; a private online network for peer-to-peer discussion; and ICMA-generated research, case studies, and white papers.

Posted on Sep 22, 2014 at 9:32 AM0 comments