Deadline looms on border

Although the Homeland Security and State departments have made progress in implementing the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, the program's broad nature and complexity could prevent the agencies from meeting congressional deadlines, according to the Government Accountability Office.

In a recent report, GAO said there are no simple solutions or alternatives to providing quick, secure access at U.S. land border ports and urged the agencies to expedite their decision-making process if they are to meet Congress' January 2008 deadline.

'Achieving the intended security benefits of the Travel Initiative by the statutory milestone date, without simply requiring all travelers to carry a passport, appears in jeopardy, given the volume of work that remains,' GAO said.

Congress in 2004 required DHS and State to implement a plan by January 2008 that requires U.S., Canadian, Mexican and Bermudan citizens to carry passports or other forms of identification when crossing the United States' northern and southern borders.

DHS and State have investigated alternatives to passports, including the People Access Security Service (PASS) card, extended frequent traveler programs, or an enhanced driver's license with additional security features.

GAO said the agencies, while making some progress, have not made critical decisions such as what kinds of documents would be required instead of a passport or how the PASS card system would be any less expensive.

And once the agencies make a determination, they then must craft an implementation plan, draft a budget, put together a public outreach campaign, coordinate with Canada and other countries, and train their own staff, the report said.

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