Don't say 'J2EE'

TRENDS & TECHNOLOGIES that affect the way government does IT

Sure, we all hate technical acronyms, but some get so widely used that it gets hard to move beyond them. One will be J2EE, no doubt, which stands for Java 2 Enterprise Edition. Overseen by Sun Microsystems Inc., J2EE is a set of specifications for deploying Java applications over a network and serves as a backbone for most application server software. Who doesn't enjoy summing up the current raging battle between two competing multitiered applications platforms as '.Net versus J2EE' (.Net being the competing platform from Microsoft Corp.).

Too bad we can't use the phrase J2EE anymore. Or at least we shouldn't. The Java Community Process Java Enterprise Edition/Standard Edition Executive Committee has approved the next generation specification of J2EE, named Java Enterprise Edition 5, or'are you ready?'Java EE 5.

There are lots of updates in Java EE 5, according to Karen Padir, Sun's vice president overseeing the Enterprise Java Platform. It is more suited to the emerging field of Web services, supporting such new standards as the Simple Object Access Protocol and the Web Services Description Language. Java EE 5 also simplifies the process of creating Web applications, perhaps in response to the rise of such rapid development technologies as Ruby on Rails. (For a full list of changes, see java.sun.com/javaee/5/javatech.html.)

So if application server vendors such as BEA Systems Inc., Red Hat Inc. and Sun itself update their application servers to Java EE 5, we may have to tell our grandchildren about the '.Net versus Java EE 5' war.

About the Author

Joab Jackson is the senior technology editor for Government Computer News.

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