Emerging Tech

Patrick Marshall

Emerging Tech

  • computer man

    Computers getting closer to replacing people?

    They've already replaced some supermarket clerks, but can machine learning help them replace lawyers?

    Comments: 1
  • Bill Gates during recent interview at Harvard

    Windows' CTRL-ALT-DEL was a good 'mistake'

    It's been a part of Windows users' lives for decades and helped make NT attractive to government. Now Bill Gates says it never should have happened.

    Comments: 2
  • Quark chip

    New chips could power the Internet of Things

    Intel hopes to put its Quark X1000 processor family into the sensors and smart devices that will drive intelligent systems.

    Comments: 2
  • up

    Moore's Law bending, ready to break

    Even everyday computers are taking quantum-like leaps in processing power.

    Comments: 1
  • voyager

    Could humans follow Voyager out of the solar system?

    People are pondering trips to Mars and beyond, but radiation is a threat. A "Star Trek"-inspired shield could be the answer.

    Comments: 2
  • NASA laser

    Moon beams: NASA set to test laser space communications

    A lunar mission launching this month will test two-way laser communications, which will transmit six times the data at 25 percent less power.

    Comments: 1
  • processor

    MIT's 110-core processor could help boost efficiency

    Chips that can effectively take advantage of multiple cores could be useful in government, giving agencies a way to downsize data centers and make them more efficient without losing processing capacity.

  • 3D mapping

    How 3D maps can get more accurate

    A research team solves a common problem with robotic 3D mapping, leading to clearer, more detailed maps.

  • atomic clock

    A clock that measures time to 18 zeros is no small thing

    NIST's ytterbium-based atomic clock measures the difference between seconds to the quintillions part, and could have practical applications.

    Comments: 1
  • BESD

    Marines using biometrics to ID friends, foes in Afghanistan

    The Biometric Enrollment and Screening Device uses a combination of facial, thumb and iris scans matched against an internal database to identify persons encountered on the battlefield.