Special Report

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Most government agencies today have a business continuity plan, but not all plans are created equal. By evaluating people, processes and technology thoroughly and then closing the gaps, agencies can help ensure that their business continuity plans will function well in an emergency.
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Networks are the hubs that keep communication flowing and vital services performed. That’s why keeping the network running in the event of disaster is critical. By following these guidelines, your network will be well prepared to withstand most disasters and help you continue to serve citizens and maintain critical functions.
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The cloud is a good choice for maintaining business continuity, especially for mission-critical applications and documents. It’s also very useful for unified communications, allowing personnel to communicate without interruption during emergencies. Choose carefully, and make sure to have a comprehensive plan and the right tools to define policies.
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Mobile devices and social media have changed the way organizations can communicate during disasters. In some cases, they can even help worker stay productive. But beware—without the right policies, they can cause problems.
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Increasingly, telework is becoming part of the fabric of business continuity. Making it work effectively means implementing telework-friendly technologies before disaster strikes, and changing your mindset to see telework as “business as usual.”
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