LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

In your article, 'Digital-signature app lets DOD users work their way up to PKI' [<a href="http://www.gcn.com/20_25/news/16931-1.htmlGCN, Aug. 27, Page 9</a>], about electronic signature and approval management software by White Sands Missile Range and the Army Medical Command, Barry West of the General Services Administration expresses his views on interoperability and scalability of this type of application used in government.

In your article, 'Digital-signature app lets DOD users work their way up to PKI' [], about electronic signature and approval management software by White Sands Missile Range and the Army Medical Command, Barry West of the General Services Administration expresses his views on interoperability and scalability of this type of application used in government.We share his views. However, his comments are presented apart from critical facts regarding our ApproveIt Desktop software and its interoperability and scalability with public-key infrastructure systems. Taken together, that could lead to a misunderstanding of the product.As West correctly states in the article, ApproveIt Desktop does not replace a PKI. By the same token, PKI is not a replacement for an application such as ApproveIt, which provides software necessary for electronically signing any format of electronic document with whatever security infrastructure is in place.A PKI simply issues and manages the certificates used by an application such as ApproveIt. If the PKI is not yet present, ApproveIt provides an X.509v3 digital certificate for each user until a PKI is deployed and then switches over to the PKI certificates. This flexibility allows ApproveIt to be used in both small office applications as well as enterprise applications.West also expresses concern over future interoperability. ApproveIt has already been tested to be interoperable with Defense Department standards as well as commercial PKI systems. While under consideration for the Army Medical Command, ApproveIt was presented to the Army's director of information systems for command, control, communications and computers, and to the deputy director of DOD's PKI program management office. It was subsequently defined as a PKI-enabled application and suitable for installation on Army desktop computers.MICHAEL LAURIESilanis Technology Inc.St. Laurent, QuebecFirst off, I love my job and the people I work with. I accepted this job somewhat knowing what I'm going to address now. I'm a workgroup manager in the Air Force as an air reserve technician, and my classification is GS-335, computer assistant.We workgroup managers work extensively with GS-334 computer specialists and GS-2210 IT specialists, mostly doing the same tasks. Our workgroup manager positions are fairly new, filled within the last year.Here are some excerpts from my Civilian Performance Plan:



Editorial Cartoon


ApproveIt'it's interoperable

GCN, Aug. 27, Page 9











Vice president, strategic planning





To retain 335s, reclassify us









  • Administers information systems

  • Installs and maintains hardware and acts as the equipment custodian for information technology assets

  • Installs, upgrades and maintains software

  • Provides guidance to users on procedures when requesting hardware and software along with analyzing the needs relative to the mission

  • Researches and purchases IT assets

  • Evaluates operability of security plans and procedures

  • Provides training and assistance to customers, to include new computer installations and setting up system and user profiles

  • Creates and maintains Web pages.

    It appears to me a portion of the work force is being neglected. All the articles I've seen about recruiting and training concentrate on the 334s and the newly classified 2210s. Both apply to our civilian positions. Am I completely wrong, or are we as 335s not competent enough to be considered for reclassification?

    When 335s pursue other jobs in the government computer world, we get rejected because we're classified as assistants.

    The usual reason given is we have a lack of specialized experience, which is equivalent to not holding a previous classification of 334.

    That's ironic, because the government realizes there's a problem within the work force and has difficulty hiring and retaining qualified people in these positions.

    I recently learned that workgroup managers are going to be receiving training toward various technical certifications. So either we're trained computer techs making vital contributions, or we're just assistants. I can see it now, some decision-maker leaning back in his chair proposing this certification program, saying, 'I just can't figure out why we can't retain our computer people.'

    Let's address the real issue: reclassification.

    SGT. STEVEN J. PAHOTA

    349 Logistics Group

    Travis Air Force Base, Calif.

    READERS SPEAK

    President Bush has created a cybersecurity advisory board, composed mainly of cabinet secretaries and the director of the Office of Management and Budget. Is this the right way to go? Do you think this board will be effective in promoting security best practices?

    To share your thoughts and read those of your colleagues, go to www.gcn.com and click on the Readers Speak button at the bottom of the main news column.

    We'll also print the most intriguing responses in an upcoming issue of GCN in the Logging Off section.

    Readers whose comments appear in the publication will receive a GCN commuter mug and a coffee gift certificate.

    So come on, tell us what you think.
  • NEXT STORY: EDITORIAL

    X
    This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
    Accept Cookies
    X
    Cookie Preferences Cookie List

    Do Not Sell My Personal Information

    When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

    Allow All Cookies

    Manage Consent Preferences

    Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

    We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

    Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

    Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

    If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

    Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

    Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

    If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

    Save Settings
    Cookie Preferences Cookie List

    Cookie List

    A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

    Strictly Necessary Cookies

    We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

    Functional Cookies

    We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

    Performance Cookies

    We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

    Sale of Personal Data

    We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

    Social Media Cookies

    We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

    Targeting Cookies

    We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.