Building an interoperable smart grid: IEEE weighs in

The newly approved IEEE 2030 standard for Smart Grid interoperability provides foundational guidance for developing the technology and equipment that will make up the world’s next generation electricity distribution and delivery systems.

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers has approved guidelines providing design characteristics for an interoperable smart grid.

The IEEE 2030 standard brings together expertise from three technical areas — power systems, communications and IT — creating an umbrella document to help guide smart-grid development, said Dick DeBlasio, who chaired the working group that created the standard.

“It is very simplistic and not strong on technical requirements,” said DeBlasio, who also is chief engineer for the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Lab and the IEEE Smart Grid liaison to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. “This is still an evolving area,” and guidelines should not be restrictive.


Related coverage:

NIST, Europeans to collaborate on smart-grid standards

Smart grid gets its first 6 standards


IEEE focuses on standards for systems rather than for equipment. The new standard provides guidance rather than technical directives, creating a reference model for interconnection and interoperability. It identifies hundreds of interfaces required in a Smart Grid system. Industry will use the document to create appropriate technical standards that engineers will be able to choose from in designing infrastructure.

The Smart Grid has been identified as a national priority to help create jobs, contribute to energy independence and curb greenhouse gas emissions by allowing the introduction of sustainable energy sources into the grid. It would use intelligent networking and automation to better control the flow and delivery of electricity to consumers, enabling a two-way flow of electricity and information between the power plant and the appliance, and points in between.

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 gave NIST the lead in developing technical standards for the United States, and the agency announced earlier in September that it would be working with its European counterparts to develop a common framework for the smart grid.

NIST released the first version of a Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards in January 2010. It identified 75 existing technical standards that were applicable to the smart grid. A second version of the framework, now in draft form, includes 83 applicable standards, some now under development by standards organizations. New standards to fill the gaps in the existing framework are being developed by the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel, headed by NIST.

Although its standards and guidance are widely adopted, NIST, because it is a U.S. government agency, does not create mandatory standards for industry or for other countries. IEEE, as an international industry association, creates the consensus-based standards that are adopted by industry in implementing the higher-level NIST framework.

“The implementation side is where IEEE comes in,” DeBlasio said. The next level of standards detail is provided by industry-specific standard-setting bodies that set technical requirements for the equipment they are manufacturing.

International standardization of Smart Grid technology is needed to provide industry with economic incentives to develop and manufacture the hardware and software needed for a 21st century power grid, DeBlasio said. “The real international interest is in import-export, it’s commerce,” he said. That is why technical standards must be kept flexible. “It’s hard enough doing it in one country.”

IEEE 2030 provides alternative approaches and best practices for achieving smart grid interoperability, defining terminology, characteristics, functional performance and evaluation criteria. It is available at the IEEE Standards Store.

Work has begun on three extensions to the standard:

  • IEEE P2030.1, Guide for Electric-Sourced Transportation Infrastructure to support electric powered vehicles.
  • IEEE P2030.2, Guide for the Interoperability of Energy Storage Systems.
  • IEEE P2030.3, Standard for Test Procedures for Electric Energy Storage Equipment and Systems.
X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.