soldier with smartphone (Army)

Emotional subtext in tweets may signal health issues

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory analyzed 171 million anonymized tweets from users near military bases to find patterns of opinion and emotion that correlate with medical visits for influenza-like illnesses.

whatsapp (dennizn/Shutterstock.com)

End-to-end encryption isn't enough security for 'real people'

Computer scientists must improve security where we are most vulnerable -- on our own devices.

Marines on a hike (Photo By: Cpl. Jeffrey Belovarac)

Wearables may lighten the load for Marines

By transmitting their real-time supply needs to platoon leaders, Marines could carry only what they need for the immediate future.

USP Tucson (Bureau of Prisons)

Can tech arrest prisoners' cellphone use?

The Bureau of Prisons is asking for help identifying technologies and systems that can prevent inmates from using contraband wireless communication devices.

smart cities

4 big opportunities for state-level innovation

States should encourage policies to stimulate investment in the digital economy, a Center for Data Innovation report finds.

cell phone conversation

BlackBerry's encrypted mobile service gets NSA approval

SecuSUITE for Government provides end-to-end encryption of voice calls and messages.

collapsed buildings (austinding/Shutterstock.com)

How mapping disasters can help devastated communities rally

Mapping software can help officials make decisions about debris cleanup, the construction of temporary housing and the rebuilding of homes.

secure mobile medical data

Endpoint security: Keeping virtual desktops safe for the remote workforce

Advanced endpoint management lets agencies secure virtual applications and desktops while giving users access to the data and applications they need.

roadbotics data collection view and map

Smartphone cameras monitor road conditions

The RoadBotics web-based app collects roadway data through the camera on any smartphone and delivers analysis of that data via the cloud.

mobile malware (Morrowind/Shutterstock.com)

Explainer: How malware gets inside your apps

Malware can be inserted into applications by attackers who modify apps and republish them, by compromised in-app advertising or by corrupted development tools.

wildfire evacuation (US Fire Administration)

Emergency apps fail real-world user-centered design test

After analyzing tweets from a wildfire evacuation, researchers found only six of the top 40 concerns were addressed by existing apps.

man texting (Preto Perola/Shutterstock.com)

App gives responders mental health info for better decisions

The RideAlong app aims to keep first responders and people with mental illness safe during interactions.

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