Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


Air Force financial management system in final stages

Air Force financial management system in final stages

The Air Force has awarded Accenture a 30-month, $73 million contract to complete work on the Defense Enterprise Account and Management System, the Air Force’s principle financial transformation initiative.

When fully implemented at all bases, DEAMS will help the Air Force comply with the Defense Department’s Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness Plan, consolidating all of its enterprise resource planning systems into a single organization. 

DEAMS essentially consolidates and streamlines financial data across the Air Force, the U.S. Transportation Command and the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, integrating data from cost accounting, purchase requests, accounts payable, financial obligations and collections and customer billing for greater accuracy and more timely financial data. 

The system is currently operational at 40 Air Force bases, managing roughly $800 million in monthly billings and cash collection and processing over 100,000 invoices for the Air Force each year. 

Posted on Sep 24, 2015 at 12:53 PM0 comments


DARPA Edge CT WAN protection

DARPA taps Raytheon to protect DOD communications

Despite the military's heavy reliance on networked communications, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency contends the wide-area network infrastructure that supports such information exchange is far too vulnerable to failures and attacks. 

DARPA's Edge-Directed Cyber Technologies for Reliable Mission Communication program aims to bolster communication resilience against both cyberattacks and common network errors by adding new capabilities to the communications devices at the edges of the network, rather than to the network itself. The EdgeCT approach would make it easier to mitigate WAN failures on the fly.

To accomplish this, DARPA awarded a Raytheon BBN-led team a contract to develop an overlay network, interconnecting users through secure connections. Through these connections, software could continuously monitor events in the larger network and their effect on traffic flow, Raytheon officials said. The overlay network also could exchange information about network conditions and then dynamically configure the way the network handles application traffic to maximize performance.

“Recovering from network attacks or working around misconfigurations can disrupt traffic for hours,” said Greg Lauer, EdgeCT principal investigator at Raytheon BBN. “Our aim on the EdgeCT program is to minimize that disruption to minutes or less. Our approach does not require control or direct observation of the wide-area network and so it can be easily deployed in end user enclaves.”

Posted on Sep 18, 2015 at 12:14 PM0 comments


Army beta tests SHARP counseling with avatars

Army explores avatar-based training

The Army last week conducted beta tests on the ELITE SHARP Command Team Trainer laptop-based training software.

The ELITE SHARP CTT program is a spinoff of the Emergent Leader Immersive Training Environment - Counseling application, which uses avatar-based scenarios to teach counseling techniques for junior leaders.  SHARP refers to sexual harassment/assault response and prevention, and the application provides instructional demonstrations and interactive practice scenarios related to SHARP incidents.

Users and participants in the beta provided feedback and comments to the developers, which will be reviewed for improving the software.  A revised version will be provided to the SHARP Program Office and then passed to the National Simulation Center for software validation.  After validation, the software will be evaluated by the Army Research Institute for its effectiveness in achieving its goal of providing better virtual or immersive training.

"We want to provide a virtual interpersonal environment for the unit command team to practice baseline knowledge and skills so they have some practice before they have to deal with a SHARP incident involving a soldier," said Ashley Russell, process improvement specialist with the Army SHARP Program Office.

Posted on Sep 16, 2015 at 1:49 PM0 comments


Building better energy models with the help of DOE supercomputers

Building better energy models with the help of DOE supercomputers

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed open source software to help improve energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings.

The Autotune code automatically calibrates building energy models with actual usage, which reduces the amount of time and expertise needed to optimize building parameters for cost and energy savings. It also increases the accuracy over current manual modeling calibration techniques.

To develop the software, the team used DOE supercomputing and computational resources -- including ORNL’s Titan supercomputer and the National Institute for Computational Sciences’ Nautilus system -- to perform millions of simulations for a range of standard building types.

On Titan, the team has been able to run annual energy simulations for more than half a million buildings and write 45 terabytes of simulation output to disk in less than one hour -- using just over a third of Titan’s nearly 300,000 CPU cores in parallel.

The Autotune code includes a backend that performs the evolutionary calibration, a web service that allows scripting for calibrating large numbers of buildings and a front-end website.

Autotune is available on GitHub.

Posted on Sep 04, 2015 at 7:20 AM0 comments


jackson open data

Jackson joins the open data movement

Jackson, Miss., is the latest city to join the open data movement with the mayor’s signing of an executive order on open data on Sept. 1.

Mayor Tony T. Yarber is leading Jackson on its first steps towards open data by establishing data policies, standardizing practices and making key city datasets available internally and to city residents through an open data portal.

According to the announcement, the order includes incentives to make sure city staff understand the purpose of data collection, how to regularly collect and publish data and how to effectively make decisions based on the data.

Longer-term goals include linking open data to the city’s performance management dashboard, sharing open data updates with the public and stakeholders and creating an initial inventory of the city’s datasets.

The city’s open data policy is part of Jackson’s participation in What Works Cities, a national initiative through Bloomberg Philanthropies that helps cities open their data. Jackson is the first of the participating What Works Cities to sign an open data executive order.

Boston and New York City also recently published new open data policies in July. New York City’s rebranded “Open Data for All” focuses on how citizens can better understand and benefit from the data, and Boston’s “Open and Protected Data Policy” establishes a stronger set of standards for the city.  

Posted on Sep 03, 2015 at 1:43 PM0 comments