Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


biometric scan (Army)

A better biometric ID for the battlefield

The Defense Department’s Special Operations Command is looking for the next generation of biometric identification devices for use in the field, during mass enrollments of personnel at forward operating bases or for watch-list matching.

According to the recent request for information, the technologies should allow the rapid collection and on-board storage of full-spectrum biometrics – including fingerprint, iris, face and voice capture -- and the transmission of that data to receive a match or no-match response.

The battery-powered device should be easy to learn and use – even when wearing gloves – and weigh less than three pounds.

Selected production models of hardware and equipment will be demonstrated at a March 2018  Tactical Biometric Event where they will be evaluated as to their accuracy and suitability for operators in a realistic environment.

More information is available here.

Posted on May 30, 2017 at 12:15 PM0 comments


next-gen ybersecurity dashboard (By Elnur/Shutterstock.com)

DHS seeks next-gen security analysis

To address the rising complexity of the threat environment, the Department of Homeland Security is looking for analytic approaches and data visualizations that can help stakeholders better understand of security risks.

DHS’s Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis works with public- and private-sector partners to provide analysis on a range of issues, including the effects of natural or human-caused events on critical infrastructure, the nexus between cyber and physical infrastructure and the impacts of cyber events on federal networks.

OCIA is looking for research, development and analysis tools and services beyond what is offered by commercial packages. Specifically, the office is requesting information on:

Analytic methods, including data/text mining, machine learning, pattern matching, forecasting, visualization, sentiment analysis, network and cluster analysis, simulations, complex event processing and neural networks.

Advanced hardware and software to analyze cyber and infrastructure risk at an advanced level.

Interactive data visualizations, graphics and multimedia products that can display information in several dimensions, showing temporal changes, hierarchies and geospatial information on dashboards or networks.

Read the request for information here.

Posted on May 25, 2017 at 10:47 AM0 comments


airport scanners (By oleandra/shutterstock.com)

State Department eyes airport security pilot in Mexico

The State Department is considering installing security equipment in eight Mexican airports as a part of an Airport Security Infrastructure Pilot Project.

According to a request for information, State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs is looking for a vendor that can upgrade airport security with biometric doors and camera systems using equipment that is certified by the Transportation Security Administration or acceptable by TSA experts and Mexico's Directorate General Aeronautical Civil.

State is looking for body and bottle-liquid scanners; a CCTV/video system with monitors, servers and storage for at least four months of continuous video; and access control via biometric locks, access cards and PINs with video surveillance.

The vendor would be responsible for supplying and installing all hardware and software, project management and training of airport staff.

More information is available here.

Posted on May 24, 2017 at 10:34 AM0 comments


lab testing (Shutterstock image)

Biotech advances may stress regulatory agencies

Federal agencies involved in regulation of biotechnology products should increase their scientific capabilities, tools and expertise to get ready for the expected wave of new products, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

Regulating new biotechnology products that have not been evaluated by the current regulatory system -- such as genetically modified plants, engineered microbes and even insects -- will impact agencies that currently conduct evaluation and testing, the report said.

“The rate at which biotechnology products are introduced -- and the types of products -- are expected to significantly increase in the next five to 10 years, and federal agencies need to prepare for this growth,” said committee chair Richard Murray of the California Institute of Technology.

To prepare, the report suggests, agencies should:

  • Evaluate current risk-analysis approaches to determine those most appropriate for new products entering the regulatory system.
  • Create pilot projects that evaluate future product types as they move from laboratory scale, to field- or prototype-scale, to full-scale operation.
  • Review existing statutes to ensure adequate oversight will cover a wider range of biotechnology products.
  • Determine whether ethical, cultural and social implications should be factored into risk assessments.
  • Ensure staffing levels, expertise and resources are sufficient to address the expected scope and scale of future biotechnology products.
  • Establish appropriate federal funding levels for sustained, multiyear research to develop the necessary advances in regulatory science.

Overall, the federal government should develop a strategy that scans the horizon for new biotechnology products, identifying and prioritizing those products that are less familiar or that present a need for more complex risk analysis, the report said.

The study was sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Agriculture.

Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 3:23 PM0 comments


Maps track early arrival of spring (USA National Phenology Network)

Maps track early arrival of spring

If it feels like spring is early this year, that's not just your imagination. A new set of maps from the USA National Phenology Network shows just how ahead of schedule spring has sprung across the county.

To build the maps, the researchers used the Spring Leaf and Bloom Indices, which are climate change indicators based on nationwide field observations collected about when enough heat has accumulated to initiate leafing and blooming in common and temperature-sensitive flowering plants.

That information was combined with recent nationwide heat and temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, including daily data used for the National Weather Service, and historical daily data from a database maintained by Oregon State University, all adjusted each day to a two-mile resolution, according to a report from the U.S. Geological Survey, the lead agency in the National Phenology Network.

When the researchers applied the plant models to the recent weather data, they were able to create national-scale daily maps of leaf emergence for these plant species.  By comparing the daily maps from this year to historical maps created the same way, they were able to show differences between this year and the long-term average (1981-2010).

Data used to develop these maps was collected by volunteers who recorded and shared phenological observations across the nation.

The USA National Phenology Network is a partnership among governmental and nongovernmental science and resource management agencies and organizations, the academic community and the public. 

Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 11:05 AM0 comments