Pulse


Pulse

By GCN Staff


Digital gov increasingly meeting expectations

Governments are doing an increasingly good job of meeting citizens’ expectations for online services, according to newly released numbers from a 2016 Accenture survey.

The survey found that 85 percent of respondents “expect the same or higher quality from government digital services as they do from commercial.” That’s up more than 10 percent from an Accenture survey done two years prior.

Over that same period, the percentage of people who said they are satisfied with government’s digital services doubled from 27 percent in 2014 to 58 percent in the 2016 survey.

The survey results are based on an online survey of 3,300 voting-age citizens and interviews with 118 public service leaders in 16 states. Accenture also found that a growing number of people want to be able to connect with government through their smartphone and on social media -- about four out of 10 respondents for both.

These numbers show that governments have done a good job of meeting citizens where they want to get information, but agencies have work to do, according to Peter Hutchinson, the Accenture strategy lead for state and local government consulting.

“With around 40 percent of citizens remaining unsatisfied with digital government, and clear evidence that digital services are generally well-received when implemented, the public sector must continue expanding the scope and increasing the quality of its digital capabilities,” he said.

Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 2:19 PM0 comments


open data portal

NJ to create central open data site

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has signed an open data law that requires agencies to publish their data on the internet so that citizens, businesses and other executive branch agencies have free and easy access to information.

Signed on Feb. 6, the New Jersey Open Data Initiative will expand on the state’s current Open Data Center and the Transparency Center — which house the state’s financial data as well as some mapping files and a licensed child care center search function, according to NJ Spotlight.

Responsibility for overseeing and implementing the open data site falls to the Treasury Department’s Liz Rowe, the deputy CTO for policy and New Jersey’s chief data officer.

For the central site, agencies can provide non-proprietary, machine-readable datasets or provide a link to open data on their own sites.

The law is similar to those passed in cities and states around the country. The measure received strong support in both houses, passing the Senate by a 30-9 vote last June and the Assembly 72-2 last December.

Posted on Feb 08, 2017 at 11:17 AM0 comments


city hall (shutterstock image)

Opening up city councils

An open source web app is making it easier for cities to connect residents to local city council offices, encouraging greater online public dialog about issues in their communities.

Councilmatic, which relies on such open source building block as Python, PostgreSQL and Apache Solr, allows residents to subscribe to email updates on specific issues, council members and meetings. It also allows users to get email updates based on Councilmember and committee.

Participatory Politics Foundation led the effort to create the online tool and worked with DataMade to build it. The app is currently used by New York City, Philadelphia and Chicago.

The code for the website is available on GitHub.

Posted on Feb 02, 2017 at 12:38 PM0 comments


protecting data privacy

Survey: Government slightly more likely to protect privacy

Confidence in the public sector’s ability to keep personal information secure is slightly higher than it is for the private sector, according to a new Citrix Systems survey.

The survey found that 54 percent of respondents said federal, state and local government organizations keep information safer, while the remainder had more faith in retail stores, banks and credit card companies.

Porter Novelli, which conducted the survey last spring and again last fall, asked 6,490 and 3,544 American adults, respectively, about their concerns about identity theft. Seventy-two percent said they were concerned, with that number breaking down to 37 percent who were very concerned and 35 percent somewhat concerned. Only 6 percent of respondents said they were not at all concerned.

Among those concerned about identity theft, 56 percent said they put more trust in government agencies, while respondents who said they weren’t concerned were split evenly between the public and private sectors.

The survey found few statistical differences in concern among ages, genders and locations, suggesting that concerns about data security are fairly universal.

The results were released to coincide with Data Privacy Day on Jan. 28. Started in Europe, the annual day to spread awareness about protecting personal information received attention from the House and Senate, which passed resolutions recognizing Jan. 28 as Data Privacy Day.

According to the National Cyber Security Alliance’s StaySafeOnline website, some public-sector supporters of the day include the National Association of State Chief Information Officers, Newport News Public Schools, the California Public Employees Retirement System and the Arkansas Department of Information Systems.

Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 2:26 PM0 comments


virtual reality hardware used by NASA to rehearse work on the International Space Station. (Photo by NASA)

Accelerating virtual reality in government

The Digital Government group at the General Services Administration has created a community focused on the implementation of virtual and augmented reality technology in government settings.

Many agencies have already started experimenting with the technology. NASA is using it for data visualization and the Department of Veterans Affairs has begun looking into VR's potential for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. But starting these programs can be difficult, and 2017 will be about making adoption easier, said Justin Herman, the VR and artificial intelligence communities lead for GSA.

When an agency wants to adopt a new technology, it must create policy development resources, show performance metrics and sometimes conduct a pilot. GSA hopes this community network of industry experts and thought leaders will be a resource for sharing, developing and implementing strategies.

VR offers “immersive storytelling” opportunities that have proven themselves in entertainment, but can also thrive in government, according to Jordan Higgins, the creative director at ByteCubed, a consulting firm specializing in innovative technologies.

“There’s definitely an immersive storytelling aspect to it and a training aspect of it, but where I think the real excitement is going to come is when it actually becomes” part of your day-to-day job, Higgins said, pointing to VR conference calls as a possible example. 

The applications will provide a better sense of scale and perspective than can be achieved by a picture or screen, Higgins said. Use cases presented at a recent GSA VR workshop featured job training opportunities, which he said could decrease training costs for agencies.

Herman said GSA wants to host a VR hackathon by early spring

“We’re trying to take a very aggressive approach to developing this because it is easy to table things and spend your time talking about it.” he said.

Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 8:55 AM0 comments