Revised uninstaller is a polished polishing package

Quarterdeck's CleanSweep, an uninstaller program released shortly after Microsoft 

Windows 95, was rough around the edges. Version 3.0 has evolved into a polished package
that's almost indispensable.

 I'm always amazed at how quickly a computer fills with extraneous or duplicate
files. I bought my present PC just two months ago, and it already holds more than 7,000
files. Unresolved registry entries and icons that connect to nothing sprout up like garden
weeds. Eliminating them makes the system run faster and more efficiently.

 Now that gigabyte-plus hard drives are standard on new machines, an uninstaller like
CleanSweep is a necessity.

 The system requirements are fairly modest, although you may need more than 12M free
on the hard drive, depending on how many programs you delete and back up. If you don't
have a CD-ROM drive, the program also comes on diskettes for $9.95 extra.

 CleanSweep has two user guides. Windows 95 and NT users get a comprehensive 100-page
manual. Windows 3.x users get documentation on the CD-ROM in Adobe Acrobat format, along
with an Acrobat reader. Context-sensitive help is available throughout the program.

 If you've used CleanSweep before, you'll find new features in Version 3.0. The
Update-It button dials Quarterdeck's World Wide Web site and automatically downloads the
latest CleanSweep version. You can check for updates manually by clicking the Update-It
button or simply configure the program to check automatically at intervals.

 The package has Registry Genie to edit the Windows Registry and Registry Sweep to
clear invalid entries safely and easily. The CleanSweep knowledge database recognizes the
files of more than 1,000 applications. It fully supports Windows NT 3.51 and 4.0.

 Safety Sweep backs up files, preserving the ones that are unsafe to remove. 


William M. Frazier, a PC hobbyist, is the postmaster of Ocean Shores, Wash.


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