NUMA servers enter first phase of integrating Unix and NT

Data center users will see Unix and Microsoft Windows NT integrated on non-uniform
memory access (NUMA) servers over the next three years.


The first phase of integration will begin this year in Sequent Computer Systems
Inc.’s NUMA-Q 2000 servers, which will execute NT applications against Unix
databases. The servers will have shared storage and systems management software under NT
and Dynix PTX, Sequent’s Unix operating system.


As NT boxes proliferate, they are becoming a management problem on Unix networks, said
Jeff Pancottine, vice president of global marketing for Sequent Computer Systems of
Beaverton, Ore.


NUMACenter, Sequent’s unified Unix and NT server architecture for data centers,
will “pull all that back together,” Pancottine said.


IRS, Army and Veterans Affairs Department organizations run applications on Sequent
NUMA-Q servers, he said.


The NUMA-Q servers can accept both Intel Deschutes quad-processor boards and Pentium
Pro quads.


Early next year, Sequent will make more operating system and management changes so that
administrators can partition the servers from a console. “You won’t have to
touch any cabling,” Pancottine said.


Sequent has announced that Digital Equipment Corp. and Oracle Corp. will be engineering
partners on its future Merced servers, scalable to 256 processors. The 64-bit servers will
run Digital Unix, Pancottine said.


Digital also will resell Sequent’s NUMA-Q servers under the Digital name, he said.


Contact Sequent Computer Systems at 703-442-9100.   n

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