Inprise says middleware tool eases updating of intranet, Internet apps

Inprise Corp., formerly Borland International Inc., has entered the transactional
middleware market.


The Scotts Valley, Calif., company’s VisiBroker Integrated Transaction Service for
Java and C++ clients and servers runs on top of SunSoft Solaris and Microsoft Windows NT
operating systems.


It is a key component of the enterprise application server that Inprise plans to
deliver later this year.


Transactional middleware makes it easier to develop and maintain intranet and Internet
applications that require frequent updates, said Steve Yellenberg, group product manager
for Inprise.


VisiBroker Integrated Transaction Service provides recovery, logging, database
integration and graphical administration services for VisiBroker distributed object
applications, he said.


The package conforms to Sun Microsystems Inc.’s Java Transaction Service and the
Object Management Group’s Common Object Request Broker Architecture 2.0
specifications.


An extension to the VisiBroker package can integrate it with existing IBM Corp. CICS,
IMS/TM and MQSeries or Tuxedo TP Monitor applications from BEA Systems Inc. of Sunnyvale,
Calif., Yellenberg said.


Since its March acquisition of Visigenic Software Inc. of San Mateo, Calif., Inprise
has been selling cross-platform CORBA products to government contractors, Yellenberg said.


The VisiBroker Integrated Transaction Service developer suite starts at $4,995.


Contact Inprise at 408-431-1000.

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