Dell delivers dual Pentium IIs in PowerEdge 4300 server

Dell Computer Corp. last month began shipping dual Pentium II processors in its
third-generation PowerEdge 4300 server.


The setup is designed for departmental file sharing, database applications and e-mail
service. A standard rack enclosure accommodates up to six of the PowerEdge 4300s, said
Russ Ray, product marketing manager for the Dell Server Product Group.


Departmental servers get upgrades every 12 months, Ray said, but the cycle for
PowerEdge enterprise servers is longer—about 18 months to two years, he said.
PowerEdge models come standard with hot-pluggable, redundant power and cooling supplies
and hot-pluggable hard drives.


Dual-processor PowerEdge servers have 100-MHz front-side bus speeds, single- or
dual-channel 80-megabyte/sec SCSI RAID disk controllers and up to six open PCI slots.


Dell factory-installs the operating system—a choice of Microsoft Windows NT Server
4.0 or Novell IntranetWare 4.11—and Hewlett-Packard OpenView Network Node Manager
Special Edition management software.


Other integration services are available through the Dell Plus for Servers program, Ray
said.


A dual 400-MHz Pentium II PowerEdge 4300 with 256M of RAM and 8G internal storage costs
$7,300; a dual 450-MHz model with 1G of RAM and 27G of internal storage is $12,400.


“We think price is a key driver” in Dell’s federal marketplace, said
Scott Weinbrandt, director of server brand marketing.


Contact Dell Computer at 512-338-4400.  

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