Johnson, industry executive of the year, vows Lockheed will deliver on FAA pact




Arthur E. Johnson, GCN’s 1998 industry executive of the year, is president and
chief operating officer of the Lockheed Martin information and services sector, a division
of Lockheed Martin Corp.


In 1997, his sector earned $6.5 billion, partly from work on the Global Transportation
Network for the U.S. Transportation Command and the Display System Replacement Program for
the Federal Aviation Administration.


“I’m proud of them,” Johnson said.


The first replacement display systems will go online in FAA’s Seattle en route
center at the end of this year, he said.


The Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Management Co. in Rockville, Md., FAA’s partner in
completing the complex infrastructure modernization, “will deliver on the commitments
that we made to FAA,” Johnson said.


Recently his sector also became one of the largest providers of welfare case management
services, “a relatively new line of business for us,” Johnson said.


Johnson directs 10 companies and 45,000 employees who work on what he called
eye-watering technology.


His executive responsibilities span more than four market segments: federal technology
services; state and municipal services; commercial products and services; and systems
integration and command, control, communications, computers and intelligence.


A graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Johnson began his career in 1969 as a
software engineer for IBM Corp.’s federal systems division. In 1971, he got lucky, he
said, and was sent to Houston to write software for NASA’s Skylab.


Johnson worked on the Skylab terminal and database management system, coding some
Fortran but mostly assembly language. “It was just the greatest kick,” he said.
“I had so much fun doing it.”


Johnson became executive assistant to John Akers, then IBM’s chairman, in 1991,
and the next year was promoted to head IBM Federal Systems Co. He was named president of
Loral’s federal systems, and then president of Lockheed Martin federal systems.


He became president and chief operating officer of the Lockheed Martin information and
services sector in August 1997.   

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