DOD Computing Briefing Book

Mission success. Lockheed Martin
Corp. has again secured its coveted place as the largest single recipient of Defense
Department contracts, according to DOD statistics released last month.


The Bethesda, Md., company last year received $12.3 billion worth of business from DOD,
followed by Boeing Co. with $10.9 billion and Raytheon Corp. with $5.7 billion. Defense
overall awarded $118.1 billion in contracts in fiscal 1998—$1.4 billion more than in
fiscal 1997.


Lockheed Martin also topped the dollar-volume list of DOD vendors receiving R&D
contracts last year with $4.8 billion. Boeing and Raytheon placed second and third,
respectively, in the R&D category with $2.1 billion and $1.1 billion.


The list of the top 100 Defense contractors is available on the Web at http://web1.whs.osd.mil/diorhome.htm.


Bone up. The Electronic Systems Center at Hanscom Air
Force Base, Mass., has signed a cooperative R&D agreement with Lockheed Martin to
define methods for demonstrating software compliance with the Defense Information
Infrastructure’s Common Operating Environment standards.


The six-month study will analyze 300 DII COE compliance criteria, which the Defense
Information Systems Agency established for software and systems interoperability. The Air
Force-Lockheed team will also evaluate current automation tools and inspection methods to
see how they might be applied to the verification process.


Play it again. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems
Command has again selected asynchronous transfer mode networking equipment from Xylan
Corp. of Calabasas, Calif., for installation aboard a second pair of carrier battle
groups.


SPAWAR in November awarded Electronic Data Systems Corp. of Herndon, Va., a delivery
order under the company’s PC LAN+ contract to install Xylan switches on two carrier
battle groups this year. The latest delivery order is part of the Navy’s Information
Technology for the 21st Century initiative, designed to modernize its fleets with
high-speed LANs capable of OC-12 transmission rates for ATM backbone connections and OC-3
rates for servers.


Clearing a logjam. The Army Forces Command has awarded
Nichols Research Corp. of Huntsville, Ala., an indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity
contract worth $325 million to provide the service with logistics support services.


Under the Logistics Joint Administrative Support Services contract, known as LOGJAMMS,
Nichols will help the Army with business process re-engineering, systems network support
and project management.


—Gregory Slabodkin
gslabodkin@gcn.com

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