VersaPath gateway products send mainframe data over IP networks

VersaPath Web-to-host gateway products from Kasten Chase Applied Research Ltd. of
Mississauga, Ontario, deliver mainframe data and applications over IP networks.


VersaPath comes with desktop PC client, browser client and thin client software, as
well as a developer kit for ActiveX custom applications.


Kasten Chase has provided host connectivity for terminals at Agriculture Department
county offices across the United States through several generations of its products. Dave
Mulder, the company’s director of technology, said some USDA offices have begun using
the new IP suite.


The three clients run concurrently, giving mainframe access to a variety of desktop
users. The clients communicate with the VersaPath configuration database in Microsoft
Access, which delivers configuration information after a user is verified. The system is
centrally administered, and desktop computers and terminals do not need upgrades to use
the client software.


VersaPath for the Desktop, released as the IP Host Gateway late last year, works with
desktop computers. VersaPath for Browser Client has a Web browser interface based on
ActiveX technology.


VersaPath for Citrix, a thin client for network computing, comes packaged with WinFrame
and MetaFrame software from Citrix Systems Inc. of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. It serves network
computers or terminals.


VersaPath supports the IBM 3270 Digital Speed Interpolation and Display System
Protocol; 3270 Systems Network Architecture; IBM 3287, 3780 and 5250 emulations; and
Digital VT100 and VT200 emulations.


Mulder said the host connectivity market remains strong, and the move from mainframes
toward a client-server model has lost momentum. Legacy hosts are stable and paid for, he
said, “so there is no rush to get rid of them.”


VersaPath products range from $15,555 for the 128-user version of the desktop client to
$33,330 for the 240-user browser client version.


Contact Kasten Chase at 781-275-2200.


About the Author

William Jackson is a Maryland-based freelance writer.

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