Briefing Book

New day Dawns. Lt. Gen. David J. Kelley, director of the Defense
Information Systems Agen-cy, has named Dawn Hartley as DISA’s new chief technology
officer.


“No one is better suited to be the chief technology officer for the agency,”
Kelley said in announcing the appointment last month.


“She has been a driving force behind the Defense Information Infrastructure’s
Common Operating Environment and the fielding of state-of-the-art software, computer
hardware and data management technology that provide efficient, flexible, secure computer
capabilities to the nation’s warfighters.”


Hartley had been DISA’s chief engineering executive for information processing
since 1997.


Day-to-day operations. The Army has set up a new center at Aberdeen
Proving Ground, Md., to manage thousands of networked PCs in use there.


The center is using Computer Associates International Inc.’s CA-Unicenter TNG
software to monitor and manage its network assets.


“In the past, when a user had a problem with their PC, a technician was dispatched
to the user location where an attempt was made to solve the problem,” said Byrne
Huntley, director of information management at the center. “With the technology
available … technicians can solve and diagnose most of these problems without ever
leaving the center.”


Oh, happy days. The Naval Construction Battalion Center at Port
Hueneme, Calif., recently completed year 2000 tests successfully.


The center, the Navy’s West Coast date code testing demonstration site, will
provide other shore facilities with help in testing 2000 fixes. The center will send its
test plan, results and lessons learned to other facilities via the Internet. For more
information, go to www.navfac.navy.mil.


“They got it right the first time,” said Rear. Adm. Stephen Johnson, manager
of the Navy Year 2000 Project Office. “It’s a good template on how to do a good
test. … It’s better to have one good example on how to do something than a dozen
bad examples.”


For a few days more. The Defense Department has extended until
September the $249 million Automatic Information Technology contract awarded to Intermec
Technologies Corp. in 1994.


Through the AIT contract, the Everett, Wash., company provides data collection gear and
services to users throughout DOD, the Coast Guard and a handful of other agencies. Buyers
can purchase equipment until Sept. 30 and up to a ceiling of $10 million. The company will
provide maintenance services through March 24, 2004.


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