BRIEFING BOOK

BRIEFING BOOK



Missed deadline. By Dec. 2, all but 'a few cats and dogs''29 scattered units in the Marine Corps'had moved from Vines 8.5 and StreetTalk 8.5 from Banyan Worldwide of Westborough, Mass., to Microsoft NT Server 4.0 and Exchange 5.5, said Brig. Gen. Robert Shea, the service's chief information officer.

The service had set Dec. 31 as the deadline for the shift, said Shea, the service's deputy chief of staff for command, control, communications, computers and intelligence. But inadequate networking infrastructure meant that not all the strays met the deadline.

Retirement forecast. Lt. Gen. William Campbell, the Army's director of information systems for command, control, communications and computers, may retire early this year, his deputy said.

'That would be my guess,' said David Borland, deputy CIO, when asked if Campbell was planning to step down soon.

'You can't stay in the military forever,' Borland said. Campbell has been the Army's CIO and DISC4 for about two years. The typical tenure is two to three years, Borland said.

Stay the course. The Navy's program for upgrading its afloat systems is on schedule for completion by the end of fiscal 2003, said Rear Adm. Richard W. Mayo, the Navy's director of space, information warfare, command and control.

'I don't see any change in IT-21,' Mayo said of the Information Technology for the 21st Century initiative. 'The resources are in place to meet the chief of naval operations' goal,' including $475 million for this year.

Tools for the job. Although minor glitches showed up during the Air Force Standard Systems Group Software Factory's fiscal 2000 rollover on Oct. 1, the use of three code-scanning tools worked well.

'We initially got a good Cobol tool, since more than 50 percent of [our] code is Cobol,' said Maj. Todd Tasseff, the SSG software factory's year 2000 program manager at Gunter Annex'Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. 'We then got another Cobol tool and a third one for C, Fortran and Oracle.'

The factory, which maintains 20 million lines of code in 60 systems, used Bridgeway 2000 Compliance Checker from Bridgeway Century Services LLC of San Rafael, Calif., for non-Cobol code.

It used Vision 2000 from Century Services Inc. of Germantown, Md., to make sure windowing schemes worked effectively, Tasseff said.

The other Cobol tool, Millennium CrossCheck from Data Integrity Corp. of Waltham, Mass., 'looks for the type of operations you normally do with dates,' such as adding, subtracting and sorting of date fields, he said.

'Bill Murray

Internet: bmurray@gcn.com

inside gcn

  • IoT security

    A 'seal of approval' for IoT security?

Reader Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group