Slaymaker to leave EPA for the private sector

Slaymaker to leave EPA for the private sector

By Christopher J. Dorobek

GCN Staff Writer

FEB. 22— Jerry Slaymaker, a long-time information technology executive with the Environmental Protection Agency, will leave government service for the public sector later this year.

Slaymaker, senior adviser to EPA's chief information officer, has provided IT management and policy guidance on issues such as business-based IT decisions, knowledge management, project management and the business value of IT.

His departure is the latest in a river of people leaving key IT posts for the private sector, including former Agriculture Department chief information officer Anne F. Thomson Reed, who left in February [www.gcn.com/vol18_no37/community/1008-1.html].

IT work force retention is a crucial concern for agencies as workers are swayed by lucrative salaries in the private sector, according to results of a survey recently released by the Information Technology Association of America of Arlington, Va. [ www.gcn.com/vol1_no1/daily-updates/1300-1.html]. Furthermore, many agency IT staff are reaching retirement age.

The CIO Council has been focusing on IT work force problems generally and is expected to recommend that the National Academy of Public Administration study how salaries affect federal recruitment and retention efforts.

Slaymaker has been at EPA for 32 years and has served in many senior management positions in IT operations and project management.

In 1998, he was president of the Government IT Executive Council. He is also a member of the Federation of Government Information Processing Councils.

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