Cross-tabulation software puts on a Web face

Cross-tabulation software puts on a Web face

By Patricia Daukantas

GCN Staff

QQQ Software Inc. of Arlington, Va., has updated its venerable cross-tabulation software for 32-bit Microsoft Windows and the Web.

TPL Tables 5.01, the first version designed for Windows 95 and its successors, allows drag-and-drop editing and output of finished tables into Hypertext Markup Language format, company president Pamela Weeks said.

Version 5.01 is the first official 32-bit edition of TPL Tables, though its 16-bit predecessor, Version 4.1b, ran under Windows 3.1, 9x and NT, Weeks said.

The new editing feature lets users drag and drop variables into a grid while designing either tables or table templates, called wafers. Data can be dropped in from tables created with previous versions of the software.

HTML spreadsheet

Publication-quality output in Adobe PostScript or Portable Document Format has been possible for several years, Weeks said, but Version 5.01 can display a PostScript table on screen for interactive editing.

Users also can produce HTML-formatted tables and subsequently open them in a spreadsheet for further analysis.

Batch jobs also are new, Weeks said. Users can write short scripts to run frequently compiled tables automatically.

TPL Tables 5.01 for 32-bit Windows costs $895 per single-computer license. QQQ Software's support is free for the first year and $300 per additional year, Weeks said.

Version 5.01 is also available for Hewlett-Packard HP-UX, SunSoft Solaris, Compaq Digital Unix and OpenVMS, Sequent Dynix/ptx and ICL Unix operating systems. The Unix editions start at $1,500, Weeks said.

Contact QQQ Software at 703-528-1288.

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