Lab Notes

Lab Notes

License and registration, please. Want to know more about a particular domain name or find out information about a company if you have only a uniform resource locator? As long as it's for legitimate purposes, you can see the domain registration information for any URL you plug in at www.allwhois.com.

Using an Internet recognition utility known as whois, the Web site shows all the information it can find from the records of longtime Internet registrar Network Solutions Inc. of Herndon, Va., about a site's IP addresses; physical addresses; telephone numbers; and administrative, billing, technical and zone contacts.

Some searches even show dates of computer upgrades. Allwhois.com does not guarantee accuracy of the information.

When inputting a URL, do not include the www. prefix, or an error message will appear.

The service is similar to that of NeoTrace graphical pinging and whois software [GCN, May 8, Page 1], except that it doesn't ping, it doesn't map and it's free.

Virtual bounty hunter. For LAN and WAN administrators who troubleshoot network problems from a queue all day, BlueOcean Software Inc. of Tampa, Fla., has a $495 package called Track-It. It's a help desk management, inventory tracking and auditing utility that acts like a Swiss Army knife of different management tools.

It can even audit older PCs running MS-DOS or IBM OS/2.

Track-it can track purchases. It has a training area and a library, and it can create reports and graphs. Track-It interfaces with desktop PC database managers such as Corel Paradox, Lotus Approach and Microsoft Access. It runs under Microsoft Windows 9x, NT and 2000.

Track-It claims to track and audit files over the Internet.

For more information, track down Track-It at www.blueocean.com.

Oops! Ever delete something by mistake and wish you could get it back? Executive Software Inc. of Glendale, Calif., has a utility that claims to protect your data with a recovery bin that can capture all deleted files, including the ones that slip by the Windows recycle bins.

Although Undelete 2.0 for Windows 9x, NT and Windows 2000 removes the vexing problem of accidental file deletions, the software appears to contradict the purpose of deleting files in the first place. It keeps them from ever going away.

More about Undelete 2.0 appears at www.execsoft.com or www.undelete.com.

'Carlos A. Soto

E-mail: csoto@gcnlab.com

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