Air Force taps SGI for early warning system

Air Force taps SGI for early warning system

By Tony Lee Orr

GCN Staff

OCT. 31'SGI will provide computer hardware to power mobile satellite stations for the Air Force's Space-Based Infrared System, the military's next-generation ballistic missile early warning system, company officials said.

SGI's federal group will supply the systems under two contracts worth a combined $13.5 million, said Daryoush Tehranchi, the company's executive manager for Defense Advanced Systems.

Under an $8.1 million contract awarded in March, SGI will provide 18 Origin 3000 servers and 27 Onyx 3000 visualization systems that will be used in mobile satellite ground stations. Both systems use SGI's Irix operating system. The Origin 3000 servers will provide information for the ground stations from the satellites, company officials said. The Onyx 3000 systems will graphically display the data for users.

The mobile ground station phase of the program complements fixed ground station sites that are already in place around the world.

Under the second contract, awarded in September, SGI sent 12 additional Origin 3000 servers for use in the early warning system, Tehranchi said. The company also supplied 11 Onyx 2 desktop systems for the project, he said. The Onyx 2 units are currently being reconfigured for use in the system.

To date, SGI has provided in excess of $120 million worth of hardware, software and services to lead contractor Lockheed Martin and its subcontractor, Aerojet of Sacramento, Calif., company officials said.

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