NMCI prime subs out management tasks

NMCI prime subs out management tasks

The $6.9 billion contract will help in the change from a paper to paperless arena, the Navy's Charley Barth says.

The lead contractor for the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet recently added storage resource management software and an electronic records management system to the $6.9 billion outsourcing contract.

Electronic Data Systems Corp. chose WQuinn Associates Inc. of Reston, Va., to integrate the enterprise edition of WQuinn's StorageCentral resource management software to 2,500 Dell ProSignia servers running Microsoft Windows 2000.

The software will control data storage and maintain a high availability of disk space on the NMCI project, said Steven Toole, vice president of marketing for WQuinn.

StorageCentral has on-the-fly disk utilization controls that prevent disks from clogging, said J.R. Fuller, director of subcontractor management at EDS.

The software also has built-in security features that prevent unauthorized files from being written to the network, Fuller said.

Under the contract, which a company official would only say is in excess of $1 million, there will also be regular storage usage audits to identify problems.

'Among the critical objectives for NMCI are improved systems reliability, reduced costs, increased productivity and enhanced network security,' Fuller said.

EDS also selected Tower Software of Australia to provide an electronic documents and records management system for the five-year contract. Touted by Navy officials as the world's largest electronic management contract ever because it will cover 360,000 PCs, the system includes security features that prevent a user from going into the intranet and editing a message.

The subcontract meets an NMCI requirement that EDS provide software to manage electronic records in accordance with the Defense Department's Records Management Application Standard.

Away with paper

Charley Barth, the Navy's program manager for electronic records management, said the contract will help the agency transform from a paper to paperless environment.

'Paper records take up a lot more physical storage space,' Barth ex-plained, adding that in the long run paper is more expensive and not as secure as keeping electronic records.

In the Navy, the records generated could include anything from troop movement orders to e-mail to a Microsoft Word or Powerpoint document or anything else that could be printed out as a paper record, Barth said.

'We're the first federal executive agency to attempt this,' Barth said. 'It's getting a lot of visibility and attention. We have the opportunity to be heroes.'

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