At NIST, seeing the future is all in a day's work

At NIST, seeing the future is all in a day's work

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology recently showed off their Smart Space Laboratory, where they evaluate new methods of pervasive computing and human-computer interaction. It's one of many projects at NIST that look over the horizon of established computing systems (see story, Page 1).

Smart Spaces are work environments, both stationary and mobile, that have embedded computers, information appliances and multimodal sensors. The computing devices, for the most part hidden from view, provide seamless access to information and systems.

The NIST team's research covers such areas as the measurement, standards and interoperability of the components in a Smart Space system.

Above: Project manager Vincent Stanford demonstrates a speech-recognition system that uses an array of analog microphones to locate a speaker within a meeting room.

Top row left: Martial Michel is the Smart Flow System architect for the program.

NIST researchers are working on a variety of systems projects:

Top row middle: Barbara Guttman is in charge of the National Software Reference Library.

Top row right: Lisa J. Carnahan is a computer scientist in the Standards and Conformance Testing Group.

Bottom row left: Gary E. Fisher is in computer forensics at the National Software Reference Library.

Bottom row middle: Lynne Rosenthal is manager of the Standards and Conformance Testing Group.

Bottom row right: John Barkley is the manager of the Software Quality Group.

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