Gibson leads Virginia county's IT division

Gibson leads Virginia county's IT division

Wanda Gibson's new position will give her more influence in organizing the office and staff training. 'The staff needs to be focused on the mainframe system while also learning new technologies like networking and Web systems,' she said.

With her promotion to director of the IT Department, Wanda Gibson's role in the Fairfax County, Va., agency will change little.

Gibson, who was appointed to the position Aug. 6, spent the last two years as the county's chief technology architect and played a major role in most of the county's IT initiatives.

Gibson's new position will give her more influence in organizing the office and training the staff.

'We need to balance the mainstream operation of legacy systems and the transition we are undergoing to those systems that the public accesses 24 hours a day,' Gibson said.

'The staff needs to be focused on the mainframe system while also learning new technologies like networking and Web systems.'

Fairfax County has an IT budget of more than $75 million and a population larger than that of seven states.

Gibson said her main priorities include adding to the county's electronic-government services'such as allowing residents to apply for land development permits online'modernizing the county's data center, and continuing geographic information system and land development system initiatives. There are at least $25 million worth of projects underway in the county, Gibson said.

Gibson served for three years as chief information officer of Arlington County, Va., and was the executive director of information systems and services at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She received her master's and bachelor's degrees from Howard.

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