IAC recognizes GSA's Bates

IAC recognizes GSA's Bates

HERSHEY, Pa.'Sandra Bates, commissioner of the General Services Administration's Federal Technology Service, yesterday received the Janice K. Mendenhall Spirit of Leadership Award from the Industry Advisory Council and the Federation of Government Information Processing Councils at the Executive Leadership Conference.

IAC and FGIPC officials honored Bates for strengthening the relationship between government and industry and for mentoring federal IT and acquisition professionals.

The councils also honored several other government and industry executives:

  • Carl Peckinpaugh, general counsel at DynCorp of Reston, Va., received the Chairman's Award for his dedication to the association.


  • Dan Chenok, branch chief for Information Policy and Technology in the Office of Management and Budget, collected the Individual Contributor of the Year award for government; Mitzi Mead, director of business development for Mercury Interactive Corp. of Vienna, Va., won the industry contributor honor.


  • Emory Miller, director of professional development at GSA, received the Individual Communicator of the Year award; Tim Long, vice president of strategic markets for ChoicePoint Inc. of Fairfax, Va., collected the industry honor.


  • GTSI Corp. of Chantilly, Va., and Indus Corp. of Vienna, Va., each won Corporate Contributor of the Year awards, for large and small businesses respectively.


  • O'Keefe & Company of McLean, Va., received the Corporate Communicator of the Year award.

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