Council finalizes recommendations on cybersecurity policy

Council finalizes recommendations on cybersecurity policy

The National Infrastructure Advisory Council today approved its recommendations for the National Strategy to Secure Cyber Space. The recommendations will be forwarded to the president, who could meet with the council this month.

A draft of the cyberspace strategy was released in September and the president is expected to sign a final version possibly as early as this month. The initial draft focused on the use of market forces and cooperation between government and the private sector to improve the state of systems security, rather than on regulation or legislation. It calls for the government to lead by example.

The council was created by the president in 2001 to advise him on cybersecurity issues and includes industry representatives from the financial services, transportation, energy, communications, IT and emergency services sectors. The recommendations were approved during the council's third meeting, held by teleconference.

Among the council's concerns was the need to encourage development of standards-based products without stifling innovation with blanket requirements for interoperability and backwards compatability. It suggested language encouraging open standards, without mandating interoperability. The government should use the 'mighty hammer' of its buying power to help establish minimum standards for security in the marketplace, the council agreed.

About the Author

William Jackson is a Maryland-based freelance writer.

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