Politics and technology mingle at Internet caucus

Henrik G. DeGyor

Al Gore wasn't the only politician to think the Internet requires lots of help from politicians. At the kickoff party of the Congressional Internet Caucus, held earlier this month at the Hart Senate Office Building, lots of pols extolled the virtues of the Internet, as staff, vendors and the media ogled technology demonstrations, sipped wine and exchanged business cards.
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On the dais were, from left, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Federal Trade Commission Chairman Timothy Muris, Sen. Conrad Burns (R-Mont.), (D-Va.) and Rep. Michael Honda (D-Calif.). Said Leahy, 'Which party is better for the Internet? Neither; it's best for the Internet when we work together.' Too bad he doesn't feel the same way about the federal judiciary.

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