DHS databases target child porn

DHS databases target child porn

The Homeland Security Department this week announced new databases and information sharing agreements to combat exploitation of children by Internet pornographers.

Operation Predator 'integrates the department's authorities to target those who exploit children,' secretary Tom Ridge said in a statement.

The department's Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement will coordinate the operations from its CyberSmuggling center in Fairfax, Va. The bureau is responsible for mobilizing IT, intelligence, investigative, and detention and removal functions.

DHS will exchange the investigative data with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Other DHS partners are the FBI, Justice Department, Postal Inspection Service and Secret Service, which will develop a National Child Victim Identification Card.

The CyberSmuggling Center 'is hosting the nation's only comprehensive, searchable system for identifying digital child pornography images,' the department said. It will seek to identify children in online images to help law enforcement agencies worldwide rescue the children involved.

DHS said that the CyberSmuggling Center already has identified the children in about 300 images and has given the information to six law enforcement agencies nationwide.

A bureau Web portal will link to all public 'Megan's Law' Web sites, which collect information about persons convicted of crimes against children. The bureau is using the FBI's National Crime Information Center database of about 300,000 names of registered sex offenders to check against 'all indices available to ICE,' the department said.

The bureau also is working with state governors and foreign countries to coordinate information about aliens in this country who have been convicted of child sex crimes and are due to be deported.


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