Incoming

Testing deal. The Air Force Materiel Command has awarded a 12-year, $2.7 billion operations, maintenance and information management support contract to Computer Sciences Corp., General Physics Corp. of New York, and Jacobs Engineering Group of Pasadena, Calif.

The contractor team, which calls itself the Aerospace Testing Alliance, will perform the work at the Arnold Engineering Development Center at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn., and at the center's Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 in White Oak, Md.

The development center is an advanced flight simulation testing facility that has tried out every type of aircraft, missile and space launch system now used by the Defense Department, according to CSC.

An alliance work force of more than 2,000 will begin work on the contract Oct. 1.
IT services. The Advanced IT Services Joint Program Office recently issued a request for proposals for a contractor to provide various IT services and program management expertise.
Submissions for the Coalition and Advanced Information Technology Integration and Operations are due Sept. 4.

The work includes:
  • Program management

  • Operations, maintenance and security for integration environments

  • Allied networks, including the Defense Information System Network-Leading Edge Services, Coalition WAN, Combined Federated Battle Lab Network and Joint Warfighter Interoperability Demonstrations

  • Site installation, integration, help desk and training

  • Demonstrations, exercises and training

  • Inventory management and acquisition of hardware and software.

AITS-JPO oversees the movement of advanced IT from the research and experimentation phase through pilot operations to full-scale deployments.

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