Miami-Dade uses IBM Web services apps

LAS VEGAS'Miami-Dade County, Fla., is among a group of initial large-scale users of new IBM Web services applications to integrate citizens, agencies and suppliers online.

Using IBM Corp.'s new apps, Miami-Dade County is tapping data from 40 departments that is stored on multiple IBM mainframes to offer e-government services.

'Because we can develop a Web service once and apply it in many different ways, additional business benefits occur on a daily basis with reduced cost and increased efficiencies,' said Ira Feuer, assistant director of enterprise technology services for Miami-Dade.

The online services revitalize existing data by making it more accessible to the public and to local officials, Feuer said yesterday at the Comdex trade show.

Michael Liebow, vice president of Web services for IBM, said the use of Web services is moving beyond the planning phase and now enterprises can use the tools to organize and migrate their operations online. Besides Miami-Dade, Visa USA and Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield are using the IBM tools, Liebow said.

'The necessary standards are in place, and IBM is now focused on helping customers leverage Web services to transform their business.'

Next up for Miami-Dade, the county wants to offer a 311 phone link to the online services. And working with legacy integration services provider ClientSoft of Miami, IBM will give police, fire and emergency services workers wireless access to mission critical information.

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