NSF funding research on e-gov topics

The National Science Foundation last month sent out a flurry of solicitations for IT research in digital government, homeland defense, distributed computing and the theoretical limits of computation.

The agency set aside $9 million to investigate unique e-government needs that cannot be met by existing e-business software. The agency will make about nine grants worth up to $400,000 per year for up to four years. For homeland security, NSF earmarked $90 million to strengthen essential networked systems such as cellular telephone networks, transportation, the Internet and other critical infrastructures.

Other NSF cluster grants include $37 million for advancing software engineering methodologies and hardware architectures, $36 million for sensor networks and an undisclosed amount for distributed computing. For more information, visit www.gcn.com and enter 177 in the GCN.com/search box.

About the Author

Joab Jackson is the senior technology editor for Government Computer News.

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