Tax filers continue to migrate online

Taxpayers continue to shift in droves from paper to electronic filing, running 10 percent ahead of last year, the IRS said today in its latest count. Filing from home computers remained steady, still up 23 percent from the same time last year.

'People are filing electronically in record numbers,' said IRS Commissioner Mark Everson.

Through March 5, out of 55.5 million returns received, 37.1 million returns were e-filed. More than 8.5 million taxpayers filed from their home computers, 23.2 percent over last year. Tax professionals electronically transmitted 25.8 million returns, up 8.4 percent. (Click for GCN.com story)

The average refund has increased 4.4 percent to $2,182. The number of direct-deposit refunds has climbed 10.3 percent ahead of 2003 to 31.1 million.

Taxpayers have also made about 9.8 million visits to the 'Where's My Refund?' service so far this tax season, almost twice as many as a year ago, reflecting activity through Feb. 29.

Taxpayers who file electronically can use the service within 72 hours of submitting their returns. Paper filers can use the feature three to four weeks after their returns are mailed.

Tax filers provide their Social Security number, filing status and refund amount. Once the information is submitted, 'Where's My Refund?' notifies the taxpayer whether the return was received and is being processed, and the expected mailing date or direct-deposit date for the refund. The service will also notify a taxpayer if a refund has been returned to the IRS as undeliverable.

About the Author

Mary Mosquera is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Records management: Look beyond the NARA mandates

    Pandemic tests electronic records management

    Between the rush enable more virtual collaboration, stalled digitization of archived records and managing records that reside in datasets, records management executives are sorting through new challenges.

  • boy learning at home (Travelpixs/Shutterstock.com)

    Tucson’s community wireless bridges the digital divide

    The city built cell sites at government-owned facilities such as fire departments and libraries that were already connected to Tucson’s existing fiber backbone.

Stay Connected