R&D funding flowing like never before

PHILADELPHIA'Federal R&D efforts in areas such as high-performance computing, grid computing and next-generation microprocessors are receiving more direct money than ever before, a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology said yesterday.

Steve Papermaster said the Bush administration requested $132 billion for R&D for fiscal 2005, up from $92 billion four years ago, and money going for life sciences research, which includes core computing and IT, is up 18 percent over the last 10 years.

'The amount going directly for research is because of the discipline and enforcement of the management processes by the administration,' Papermaster said. 'We also are looking for results, and that is making a difference, too.'

Papermaster, speaking at the 24th annual Management of Change conference sponsored by the American Council for Technology, said research spending also could lead to wider use of next-generation WiFi technologies, including WiMax, which uses the 802.16 protocol.

'This could accelerate broadband a hundredfold,' he said. 'But we have to transform the wireless technologies to include the new configuration.'

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