People on the Move

Office of Management and Budget controller Linda Springer, who has been with OMB since September 2002 and controller of the Office of Federal Financial Management since March 2003, is leaving government. No details on when her last day will be or where she will go next were available at press time.

During her tenure, she led the improved financial performance effort under the President's Management Agenda, pushed agencies to close their year-end books in 45 days, led the lines-of-business financial management and grants management consolidation initiatives, and began updating OMB Circular 123 on internal controls.

The Senate last month confirmed David Safavian as administrator for the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, ending the agency's 14-month wait for a new procurement chief. He replaces Angela Styles, who returned to industry in September 2003.

Safavian had been working for the past year at OMB as a counselor to deputy director for management Clay Johnson.

Robert Burton had been acting OFPP administrator while Safavian awaited Senate confirmation.

The Navy has named Vice Adm. James D. McArthur to be deputy CIO. He'll lead the newly established Enterprise IT Transformation Office as its assistant chief of naval operations for IT.

Prior to the appointment, Rear Adm. Robert Dunham Reilly Jr. filled the job as Navy deputy CIO. Reilly still works in the Navy CIO office as an assistant to the deputy CIO.

Francis J. Harvey won Senate confirmation last month as secretary of the Army.

President Bush had initially nominated Harvey to replace John Stenbit as Defense CIO, but after a stall in the Senate, he nominated him in September to replace Thomas White in the Army's top job.

Edwin E. Fielder was named last month as the General Services Administration's acting chief of staff and acting interim chief acquisition officer.

The former administrator of GSA's Southeast and Sunbelt region replaces Karl Reichelt, who left government for industry.

Joiwind Ronen, executive director of the Industry Advisory Council and the American Council for Technology, will step down next year as soon as a replacement is found.

Ronen, who took over for Alan Balutis in May 2003, said she expects to stay with IAC and ACT until the spring.

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