Defense looking for advanced teleconferencing

Defense looking for advanced teleconferencing

The Defense Department is looking for ideas on how to use global videoconferencing technologies to enhance command and control.

The Defense Information Systems Agency's Network Video Service Program Management Office has released a request for information about products to fulfill Defense requirements for video, audio and interactive graphics. Responses to the RFI are due by Jan. 20.

According to the RFI, videoconferencing is a critical C2 element for Defense. Combatant commands use it to execute war and exercise plans, and for military training, simulation and general command operations.

DISA said it wants vendors that can support about 21 different services and features. Some of these are:

  • Integrated real-time video and future capabilities to include voice and data conferencing


  • Compliance with the latest federal telecommunications recommendation for videoconferencing


  • Use of the Internet Engineering Task Force's Session Initiation Protocol


  • Conferencing capabilities among users on multiple network topologies, including IP, T1 and Integrated Services Digital Network


  • All forms of real-time videoconferencing applications, including teleconferencing, teletraining, telemedicine and remote maintenance


  • A variety of conferencing equipment suites including configurations for studio, room, desktop, mobile, satellite and deployable environments and the ability to manage remotely.


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