SBA taps McClam as acting CIO

The Small Business Administration has elevated Charles T. McClam from deputy CIO to acting CIO. McClam will oversee the agency's information technology policy and ensure it complies with the President's Management Agenda.

McClam replaced Jerry Williams, who left SBA in June to be deputy CIO at the Agriculture Department. McClam became acting CIO July 11.

Prior to joining SBA, McClam served as a senior IT executive and program manager at the IRS, where he managed key tax collection systems and was a key official for implementing the IRS' E-services program. He also led the design, development and prioritization of many of the modernized computer systems that are replacing the agency's antiquated collection systems.

He also spent time at the Justice Department as assistant director for information management and security, where he helped integrate an IT planning and investment control system for the agency's budget process.

McClam holds a bachelor's degree from Voorhees College and a master's in public administration from Troy State. He also completed graduate studies at the University of Southern California, the Florida Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

SBA has been without a permanent CIO since Stephen Galvan became the agency's chief of staff in August 2004. Galvan became SBA's acting deputy administrator in July.

New project manager also named

SBA also named Shivani Desai as the new project manager for its Business Gateway E-Government project, one of the 25 initiatives sponsored by the Office of Management and Budget.

Desai joined SBA in July after spending more than 18 months as an OMB portfolio manager for the government-to-business e-government projects. She replaces Justin Van Epps, who had been interim project manager since June 2004.

Desai will help push forward the Business Gateway project, which has been teetering along for the past few years. She will concentrate on modifying Business.gov, updating the number of federal forms available to citizens and businesses in Business.gov's catalog, identifying business compliance assistance tools and creating a data sharing infrastructure across agencies to simplify the reporting process for businesses.

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