The Pipeline


Eliminate passwords in a flash

If you think passwords are passé, you might be interested in EntryPoint, a new security solution from Saflink. Although the product is mainly for small and
midsize businesses, federal agencies might also want to take note.

EntryPoint replaces passwords with a standard USB flash drive reconfigured to function as a token. When users log on to Microsoft Windows workstations and networks, they insert the token into a USB slot on the computer and type a personal identification number or place their finger on the token's fingerprint reader if it has one. To log off, users simply remove the token and take it with them.

The solution also includes a security appliance, appliance software and client software.

The security appliance is a stand-alone, rackmountable device built in an Intel-based hardware appliance format. It's available in several solution bundles and delivered with the EntryPoint appliance software. According to Saflink, an administrator can deploy the appliance in less than an hour.

The appliance software, powered by Windows Server 2003, includes a configuration setup module and a Web management interface that guides administrators through the installation process and allows them to perform maintenance tasks.

Standard license pricing for EntryPoint ranges from $4,495 for a 10-user bundle to $14,295 for a 200-user bundle.

Switching up

Avocent recently introduced the industry's first high-density keyboard-, video- and mouse-over-IP switches. The DSR8035 can accommodate up to eight digital users, and the DSR2035 allows up to two digital users.

Both appliances have 32 ports, which eases management by reducing the number of switches required to run many servers.

Both
switches feature two network interfaces for failover redundancy and enable users to remotely access servers with either an onboard Web interface or management software.

Other features include five USB 2.0 ports, configurable authentication at local ports and BIOS-level control of all connected servers and serial-based devices.

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