GSA to hold Alliant briefing next month

The General Services Administration will hold its industry day on the Alliant contracts in February to discuss any changes made to the $65 billion IT procurement, an agency spokesman said.

John Johnson, GSA's assistant commissioner of service development and service delivery, and his team will hold the conference next month, although no specific date has been set, said Blake Williams, a GSA spokesman. GSA will issue the details at a later date, he said.

Johnson originally planned to hold a public forum in the second half of November. That date was then moved to early December and then early January.

The forum will give industry and other interested parties another chance to voice their opinions on the 10-year governmentwide acquisition contract that will let agencies buy IT solutions and complex integration services.

GSA issued Alliant's first draft request for proposals March 31. The agency held Alliant presolicitation conferences April 18 in Washington and April 26 in San Diego. No specific date has been set yet for the final RFPs, which will come out in 2006.

Alliant consists of two separate procurements. The Alliant Full and Open contract is valued at $50 billion, while the Alliant Small Business set-aside is valued at $15 billion. GSA plans to issue 20 awards for the full and open, and 40 awards for the small business contract in 2006.

Roseanne Gerin is a staff writer for Government Computer News' sister publication, Washington Technology.

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