Meagher to become Interior deputy CIO

Veterans Affairs Department chief technology officer Ed Meagher will become deputy CIO at the Interior Department, effective Feb. 16. He begins working at Interior under CIO Hord Tipton Feb. 20.

The long-time VA technology executive sent out an email yesterday 'with mixed emotions' to announce his move.

Meagher had been deputy CIO from 2001. Earlier this month, VA CIO Robert McFarland announced Meagher was to become the department's CTO, which was effective yesterday.

'When I came to the VA, my goals were to help enable the department to become the best information technology environment in government and to assist in the transformation to veteran-centric IT systems. While much remains to be done, I believe we have made great strides in these areas,' he said, citing accomplishments in enterprise architecture, cybersecurity, telecommunications modernization and professional program management.

The VA CIO's office has been undergoing reorganization since Congress in this year's appropriations gave the department CIO authority over the IT budget. Previously, the majority of the IT budget was in the hands of VA's administrations for health care, benefits and burial.

Meagher, an Air Force Vietnam veteran, has received numerous awards for his federal IT leadership and performance. He is also president of the executive board of the Association for Federal Information Resource Management.

About the Author

Mary Mosquera is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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