Schedule 70 step by step

Who runs Schedule 70?

The GSA Federal Acquisition Service.

Program manager:

Pat Brooks, pat.brooks@gsa.gov

How many vendors does it have?

Large: 5,113

Small: 578

8(a) (small, disadvantaged): 927

Women-owned: 998

HUBZone: 69

Veteran-owned: 771

Service-disabled veteran owned: 219


What products/services are available?

General-purpose, commercial information technology equipment, software and professional services.

When was Schedule 70 established?

Early to mid 1970s.

How many vendors did it have in the beginning, and what were sales?

Though Schedule 70 was established in the mid 1970s, data collection did not begin until 1995. In 1995, it had approximately 539 vendors and total sales of $1.8 billion.

How many years are vendors on Schedule 70?

There is a base period of five years with the possibility of up to three five-year options, for a possible total of 20 years.

How many years until Schedule 70 expires?

The Schedule 70 solicitation is an open solicitation that is updated and refreshed as needed. There is no closing date.

What are the fees? Who must pay?

Quarterly, contractors remit a check for the Industrial Funding Fee, 0.75 percent of sales realized as a result of delivery and task orders awarded by government customers. The fee is included in the price billed to government customers.

How do you order?

For orders of supplies and/or services at, or below, the micropurchase threshold:
Place the order with any schedule contractor that can meet the agency's needs. There is no requirement to solicit from a specific number of schedule contractors, but purchasers should attempt to distribute orders among contractors (FAR 8.405).
For orders exceeding the micropurchase threshold, but not exceeding the maximum order threshold:
  • For supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work: Survey at least three schedule contractors through the GSA Advantage online shopping service, or review the catalogs or price lists of at least three schedule contractors and seek additional price reductions where appropriate; evaluate; and make a best-value selection.

  • For services requiring an SOW: Prepare a request for quotation that includes the statement of work and the evaluation criteria; transmit the request to at least three schedule contractors; evaluate responses; and make a best-value selection.

Note: Each schedule contractor has a maximum order threshold, which will vary by special-item number. The maximum order threshold represents the point where, given the dollar value of the potential order, the ordering activity shall seek a price reduction.

For orders exceeding the maximum order threshold or when establishing a Blanket Purchasing Agreement:
  • For supplies and services not requiring an SOW: Follow the same procedures for orders exceeding the micropurchase threshold, except review additional schedule contractors' price lists (the GSA Advantage online shopping service may be used to facilitate this review); evaluate; seek price reductions; and make a best-value selection.

  • For services requiring an SOW: Follow the same procedures for orders exceeding the micropurchase threshold, except transmit the RFQ (including the statement of work and evaluation criteria) to additional schedule contractors that offer services that will meet the needs of the ordering activity; evaluate responses (using the evaluation criteria provided in the RFQ); seek price reductions; and make a best-value selection. When determining the appropriate number of additional Schedule contractors, the ordering activity may consider the complexity, scope, and estimated value of the requirement, and the market search results.

Note: When ordering services exceeding $100,000 using Defense Department funds, ordering activities shall follow the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, which has been amended to implement Section 803 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002 (Public Law 107-107). DOD offices and non-DOD activities placing orders on behalf of DOD should refer to DFARS 208.404-70 for additional information regarding ordering procedures and documentation requirements.

What documentation is required when placing orders against GSA schedule contracts?

Those requirements are outlined in FAR 8.405-1(e) and 8.405-2(e). Documentation should contain the following basic information:
For supplies, and services not requiring an SOW:
  • The schedule contracts considered, noting the contractor from which the supply or service was purchased

  • A description of the supply or service purchased

  • The amount paid

  • If applicable, the circumstances and rationale for limiting consideration of schedule contractors to fewer than required in the Ordering Procedures for Supplies, and Services Not Requiring a Statement of Work (see FAR 8.405-6).

For services that require an SOW:
  • The Schedule contracts considered, noting the contractor from which the service was purchased

  • A description of the service purchased

  • The amount paid

  • If applicable, the circumstances and rationale for limiting consideration of schedule contractors to fewer than required in the Ordering Procedures for Services Requiring a Statement of Work (see FAR 8.405-6)

  • The evaluation methodology used in selecting the contractor to receive the order

  • The rationale for any trade-offs in making the selection

  • The fair and reasonable price determination required by FAR 8.405-2(d)
  • If applicable, the rationale for using other than a firm-fixed price order or a performance-based order.

Note: When ordering services exceeding $100,000 using DOD funds, ordering activities shall follow the DFARS, which has been amended to implement Section 803 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002. DOD offices and non-DOD activities placing orders on behalf of DOD should refer to DFARS 208.404-70 for information on ordering procedures and documentation requirements.

What are the most recent product/ service additions or subtractions
to Schedule 70?


SIN 132-60: Access Certificates for Electronic Services Program. This program provides identity management and authentication services and ACES digital certificates for use primarily by external end users to access federal electronic services and transactions in accordance with the X.509 Certificate Policy.

SIN 132-61: PKI Shared Service Providers Program. This program provides PKI services and digital certificates for use by federal employees and contractors to the federal government in accordance with the X.509 Certificate Policy for the U.S. Federal PKI Common Policy Framework.

SIN 132-62: HSPD-12 Product and Service Components. SIN 132-62 is established for products and services for agencies to implement the requirements of HSPD-12, FIPS-201 and associated National Institute of Standards and Technology special publications. The HSPD-12 implementation components specified under this SIN are:
  • PIV enrollment and registration services

  • PIV systems infrastructure

  • PIV card management and production services

  • PIV card finalization services

  • Physical-access control products and services

  • Logical-access control products and services

  • PIV system integration services

  • Approved FIPS-201-compliant products and services.


Total sales over the last seven years

2000 $9.3 billion

2001 $10.8 billion

2002 $12.9 billion

2003 $14.7 billion

2004 $16.8 billion

2005 $16.9 billion

2006 to date $12.9 billion

What other GWACs or MACs compete with Schedule 70?

GSA GWACs:
Millennia

Millennia Lite.

Applications and support for widely diverse end user requirements:

Alliant and Alliant SB (small business)

8(a)Stars

HUBZone Contracts

Seat Management Services Contract

Smart Card (expired 5/17/06; added to Schedule 70 under 132-62)

VETS'Veterans Technology Services.

Other agencies also have IT-related GWACs and MACs that provide products and services similar to Schedule 70.

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