Army awards contract for battlefield intel support

The Army has awarded DRS Technologies Inc. a contract worth $396 million to deliver rugged computer systems and peripheral equipment for an Army program designed to give forces better battlefield intelligence.

DRS Technologies will begin work on a $79.9 million task order under the indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract for the Army's Force XXI Battle Command, Brigade and Below program.

The Army's Communication-Electronics Life Cycle Management Command in Fort Monmouth, N.J., awarded the contract.

For this order, the company's DRS Tactical Systems unit in Melbourne, Fla., will furnish rugged Appliqu' Computer Systems, including processor, display and keyboard units as well as rugged solid-state hard disk drives and mission data loaders.

Installed on more than 40 vehicle types, including wheeled and tracked vehicles, as well as Tactical Operations Centers and other command post platforms, DRS' Appliqu' Computer Systems support the Army's Blue Force Tracking requirements.

Blue Force Tracking requirements include line-of-sight reporting and tracking as well as integration of vertical and horizontal information to furnish forces engaged with a precise visual picture of the battlefield.

The Force XXI Battle Command, Brigade and Below program is focused on developing a digital battle command information system designed to give commanders, leaders and soldiers improved information for command and control and better awareness of tactical battlefield situations.

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Government Computer News' sister publication, Washington Technology.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • business meeting (Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com)

    Civic tech volunteers help states with legacy systems

    As COVID-19 exposed vulnerabilities in state and local government IT systems, the newly formed U.S. Digital Response stepped in to help. Its successes offer insight into existing barriers and the future of the civic tech movement.

  • data analytics (Shutterstock.com)

    More visible data helps drive DOD decision-making

    CDOs in the Defense Department are opening up their data to take advantage of artificial intelligence and machine learning tools that help surface insights and improve decision-making.

Stay Connected